Changing History: Virginia Women through Four Centuries

By Burin, Nikki Berg | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, October 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Changing History: Virginia Women through Four Centuries


Burin, Nikki Berg, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


Changing History: Virginia Women Through Four Centuries * Cynthia A. Kierner, Jennifer R. Loux, and Megan Taylor Shockley * Richmond: Library of Virginia, 2013 * xvii, 460 pp. * $24.95

It is hard to imagine current or future scholars of Virginia's history excluding Changing History: Virginia Women through Four Centuries from their bibliographies. Cynthia Kierner, Jennifer Loux, and Megan Taylor Shockley have skillfully demonstrated how the historical narrative of Virginia women is no mere special interest story but is rather an integral component of the history of the Old Dominion. One cannot know the state's history without understanding the collective and unique histories of its women. Spanning four centuries, from the seventeenth through the twentieth, Changing History emphasizes the intersection of race, class, and gender in Virginia women's lives and is replete with evidence of how women of all backgrounds continually attempted and sometimes succeeded in breaking down the barriers associated with those social categories. Changing History is ultimately a story of perseverance for Virginia's women, because though their march toward equality has been slow and arduous, it has also been impassioned and steady.

The authors each wrote the sections of the book that best fit their individual expertise: Kierner tackled the first three chapters on colonial and early national history, Loux composed the chapter on the 1850s through Reconstruction, and Shockley wrote the remaining chapters on the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. The end product is seamless and flows as if written by a single author. Such smooth and collaborative writing makes for an enjoyable read.

The authors contend that Virginia is "a commonwealth of contradictions" (p. 354). Although they present a fundamentally progressive narrative, highlighting examples of women's empowerment, theirs is not a romanticized history. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Changing History: Virginia Women through Four Centuries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.