Excessive Use of Internet Hurts Grades, Study Shows

The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan), January 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Excessive Use of Internet Hurts Grades, Study Shows


Excessive use of the Internet adversely affects the academic performance of schoolchildren, a survey by the education ministry indicates.

The survey, the results of which the ministry recently released, on the possible relation between children's academic performance and their lifestyles showed that children who spend many hours on the Internet and video games tend to perform poorly in arithmetic, while children who often watch TV news and read newspapers tend to perform well in the Japanese language.

The Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry analyzed national achievement tests given to all students in the sixth grade of primary schools and the third year of middle schools in April. It plans to convey the results of its analysis to each school to help improve teaching methods.

The national tests covered Japanese and mathematics, and each subject included basic comprehension questions and questions to measure applied skills. Students also filled out a questionnaire on their lifestyles, and teachers were asked to answer questions on their teaching methods.

The ministry analyzed the relationship between the amount of time students daily spent online and the average percentage of questions answered correctly in the tests. The analysis showed that more time spent online tended to translate into lower scores. For arithmetic comprehension problems for sixth-grade primary school students, students who answered they "spend less than one hour using the Internet" scored the highest average percentage of correct answers--79.5 percent--while the average for students who used the Internet for "more than four hours" was 68. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Excessive Use of Internet Hurts Grades, Study Shows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.