Faith-Based Early Childhood Education Faces Challenges

By McDonald, Dale | Momentum, November/December 2013 | Go to article overview

Faith-Based Early Childhood Education Faces Challenges


McDonald, Dale, Momentum


Efforts to provide universal pre-K programs, as well as to regulate early childhood programs and providers, may have negative consequences for Catholic school pre-K programs and faith-based pre-schools.

While gridlock continues to impede progress on most legislation in Congress, two bills that potentially will have a serious impact on early childhood education are receiving some attention in both houses. Efforts to provide universal pre-K programs, as well as to regulate early childhood programs and providers, may have negative consequences for Catholic school pre-K programs and faith-based pre-schools.

The Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 1990 (CCDBG) has provided eligible low-income families with certificates (vouchers) to purchase child-care for their children so they can work or attend adult training/education programs. Parents or guardians may choose from a variety of providers including pre-K programs in Catholic schools and religiously affiliated daycare programs. A hallmark of the program has been the primacy of parental choice and approximately 90 percent of the allocated funds are used for certificates that families obtain through social services agencies. The other 10 percent is utilized by providers to operate programs that enroll students at little or no cost to the family.

Proposed HHS regulations now are looking to alter that balance in favor of grants or contracts to providers who will offer specific types of childcare to expand the range of services to targeted populations, such as special needs or geographically underserved areas.

Child Care Grants

Recently, the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) approved a bill (S. 1086) to reauthorize the Child Care Block Development Grants. The bill is modeled after new regulations proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that administers the program. The bill proposed a variety of new program health and safety standards and program quality standards that would be applicable to providers that accept certificates or receive grants or contracts to operate programs. The potential impact of new standards on faith-based private providers still is not clear.

Among the requirements are measures pertaining to safeguarding the health and safety of children in care outside the home. Many of these regulations are common-sense principles consistent with state and local regulations already in place that are followed by faith-based providers both in schools as well as in free-standing daycare programs. Most Catholic providers do obtain background checks and follow the guidelines outlined by bishops in "The Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People," and require training of adults in creating a safe environment for children and youth.

More problematic are requirements pertaining to state-mandated standards that would not only set group size limits and ratios of children to adults, but also require adherence to research-based and state-developed early learning and developmentally appropriate guidelines aligned with state standards for K-3 education. States would be required to develop program and personnel licensure requirements and mandatory professional development programs that relate to "age-appropriate curricula and teaching strategies that are aligned with social, emotional, physical and cognitive development of children" for staff who deal directly with children.

There is no indication in the bill regarding how standards, quality of programs or other requirements will be determined by the states and whether religious accommodations will be made for faith-based providers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Faith-Based Early Childhood Education Faces Challenges
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.