Remarkable Photographs of Clarence B. Moore's Expedition to the Ouachita River Valley, Louisiana, 1908-1909

By Birchett, Thomas C. C.; Pearson, Charles E. et al. | Southeastern Archaeology, Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

Remarkable Photographs of Clarence B. Moore's Expedition to the Ouachita River Valley, Louisiana, 1908-1909


Birchett, Thomas C. C., Pearson, Charles E., Weinstein, Richard A., Southeastern Archaeology


Clarence Bloomfield Moore (1852-1936) is one of the most important historical figures in American archaeology. From the mid-1870s to the early 1920s he undertook excavations at prehistoric sites throughout the southeastern United States, concentrating on the examination of burial mounds. Moore's position and reputation among Southeastern archaeologists today is ambivalent. Most decry his field methods and lament the destruction he must have wrought at innumerable sites across the Southeast. On the other hand, Moore has garnered tolerance if not approval in the fact that the results of most of his work were published over the years in the Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (Aten and Milanich 2003:127-133; Knight 1996:15-16; Larson 1998:2). These lavishly illustrated publications have since served as important resources for Southeastern archaeologists.

After 1895, Moore conducted most of his investigations from the small, sternwheel steamboat Gopher, which he had built that year in Jacksonville, Florida, expressly for his archaeological research (Pearson et al. 2000). Aboard the Gopher, Moore, his staff, and digging crew traveled along most of the important waterways in the Southeast in search of prehistoric sites. The past decade has seen a revival of interest in C. B. Moore and his work, most evident in the republication of his original Academy of Natural Sciences publications by the University of Alabama Press with introductions and commentary by archaeologists currently working in the Southeast. The present authors have shared in this recent renewal of interest in Moore, including his use of the stemwheeler Gopher (Pearson et al. 2000; Pearson and Cook 2003; Weinstein et al. 2003), and we have kept our eyes open for any new Moore material.

In January 2007, at the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in Williamsburg, Virginia, two of us (Birchett and Pearson) ran into an old friend, Noreen Carroll. Carroll mentioned that she was then working at the Smithsonian Institution and involved in organizing and cataloging recently received collections of manuscripts and photographs. Birchett asked her if she had run across any collections related to Moore or his steamboat Gopher. As a maritime archaeologist interested in boats, Carroll remembered seeing a collection containing some photographs of a steamboat that may have been the Gopher. Subsequently, Birchett got in touch with Carroll, who located a collection of photographs comprising the Arthur W. Clime collection. At that time, the photographs had been accessioned and added to the Smithsonian's catalogue system but were not in the online information system (Smithsonian Institution Research Information System). The photographs were described as "depicting archeological crews digging, posing for camera on site with tools, eating meals, sawing logs and crew on riverboat," and they did include images of a steamboat named Gopher. Birchett obtained copies of all of the photographs and recognized immediately that they included not only previously unknown images of Moore's steamer Gopher but also photographs of Moore's field crew at work, his longtime companion and assistant Dr. Milo Miller, and, most remarkably, photographs of an individual we have identified as Moore overseeing the excavations. Despite Moore's long career, few photographs of him exist, and we knew of no other photographic images depicting him working in the field. This knowledge stimulated a search into the background and history of these photographs. Who took them, when were they taken, where were they taken, and whom did they depict? The results of this search are presented here.

Arthur Westphall Clime Sr. and the Clime Collection of Photographs

The Arthur W. Clime collection consists of a group of 23 photographs cataloged as Photograph Lot 2000-78 in the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution. At the urging of Lawrence Aten, the collection was donated to the Smithsonian by Arthur Clime's widow, Celia Clime, in September 2000 (Lawrence E. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Remarkable Photographs of Clarence B. Moore's Expedition to the Ouachita River Valley, Louisiana, 1908-1909
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.