Will Moral Issues Mar Woody Allen's Oscar Chances?

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), February 5, 2014 | Go to article overview

Will Moral Issues Mar Woody Allen's Oscar Chances?


Chennai, Feb. 4 -- Often, juries can be idiosyncratic. Often, they make judgements which are emotional, which are moralistic. But there are times, when juries are logical and rational, firmly setting aside their personal compulsions.

The question that will be troubling the American director, Woody Allen, now is whether the 6000-odd members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will be guided by ethical questions. Or, will they look at his work - and work alone - with precision and professionalism, ignoring the recent allegations of sexual molestation by his adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow.

(The members will begin voting in the next few days. The Oscars will be presented on March 2 at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles. Allen's The Blue Jasmine is running for several Academy Awards.)

Farrow is now 28, and she wrote an open letter to the media accusing Allen ofwhen she was seven - which was a good 21 years ago. She described in detail how her foster father had abused her after asking her to lie on her stomach and play with a toy.

Incidentally, the charge of molestation was first made by Farrow's mother, Mia Farrow, in 1993, when she was fighting a custody battle with Allen over her three children. The charge was probed, but never proved. And Allen has now denied the whole thing.

In the case of , while the psychiatrists examining her in 1993 gave Allen a clean chit, the judge had been with the mother and daughter.

The raging debate now is on how the Academy members ought to view the Allen episode. …

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