Constellation of Leo

By Henderson, Michael | The Spectator, March 29, 2003 | Go to article overview

Constellation of Leo


Henderson, Michael, The Spectator


The world has been going to the dogs for as long as anybody can remember, but it seems there is a particular urgency about our current rush towards the maison des chiens. The slightest thing can trigger off a lament for old ways. Alan Keith died last week at the age of 94, and we shall never again hear that gentle voice on Radio Two introducing popular classics for listeners who treasured his courtly manner.

And what do we get instead on `the nation's fastest-growing station'? Not Brian Matthew's excellent late-night show, Round Midnight, which was far too good for the cloth-eared nincompoops who make decisions in Lord Rat's Empire of the Dumb. There's no room either for that superb broadcaster, John Dunn, another man with a sympathetic manner. No, we must put up with a brigade of adolescent show-offs, the most egregious being an out-and-out vulgarian called Maconie, although Quentin Cooper, a breathless showbiz bunny-boiler, who brings the bumptiousness of the truly ignoAh yes, the recent past. How strange it seems. We want to go back and reclaim what worked, but find that times have passed, sometimes for better, usually for worse. And so it is with sport. The modern performer is a very serious chap, who tends to talk about 'focus' and other cheery wheezes. Goodness, rugby players don't even go on the sauce any more. Not as often as once they did, at any rate.

So any opportunity to celebrate the sportsmen of the recent past, who contributed more than the sum of goals scored or runs made, must be seized. This week, the inaugural WH Smith sports book of the year award went, on the vote of myself and three others, to Leo McKinstry for his wonderful life of the Charlton brothers, called, simply, Jack and Bobby. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Constellation of Leo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.