Open House


JUNIPERO SERRA CREDITED FOR SANTA BARBARA'S CHARM

Re: "The City of Dreams" (June, page 26). read the whole terrific article on Santa Barbara waiting for a mention of how this beautiful town came to be in the first place. Fray Junipero Serra originally chose the site of Mission Santa Barbara. Don't you think the mission's architecture and endurance explain the whole-city reformation style in 1925?

Mary Boule

VASHON, WASHINGTON

ON THE TRAIL WITH THE MARSHALL FAMILY

The Centennial Western Wanderings series by Peter Fish reminded me that my family, too, crossed the country the hard way. I thought you might enjoy this excerpt from an account written by my great-great-grandfather John Marshall of his journey on the Oregon-California Trail in 1859-60.

"There may be seen the newly made grave with a piece of board with a name and date, here the bones of some who had fallen unknown and unburied. Here and there, too, see the wrecks of good wagons left by those whose teams had failed, ox yokes, harnesses, chains, guns, tools, etc. left by those (who), to save their lives, had abandoned them." At trail's end in Grass Valley, California, after traveling 2,105 miles, he wrote, "Right glad to stop and rest."

Julie Marshall Rivett

LOS ALAMITOS, CALIFORNIA

INSPIRED BY CHIEF JOSEPH

Re: "Joseph's Country" in Western Wanderings (June, page 18). I grew up in Idaho and Montana. Good teachers instilled within me the love of Chief Joseph's words "From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever." His words continue to haunt and inspire us.

Barbara Kishbaugh

TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA

IN DEFENSE OF OFF-ROAD TRAVEL

The 100th anniversary issue was spectacular-up to the point in "Great Parks, No Crowds" (May, page 120) where it stated "off-road vehicle enthusiasts rip up roadless areas." My husband and I are avid off-roaders. We don't tear up roadless areas. Many of our off-road travels are on old, abandoned mining roads, especially in Arizona and Colorado. We use established trails because we want to make sure that our children have the same privilege of seeing the hidden treasures that make the West an ongoing adventure. …

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