Metabolism Tune-Up

By Morano, Rob | Vegetarian Times, May 2003 | Go to article overview

Metabolism Tune-Up


Morano, Rob, Vegetarian Times


Optimize your energy naturally

As a pack-a-day smoker who got litde sleep or exercise and almost no relief from the roller coaster of self-- employment, I was a high-stress, low-energy junkie. Only large and frequent defibrillations of caffeine and sugar gave me the jolt I needed to meet copy deadlines. And after a' few years, even they weren't enough.

It seemed like life - and possibly death - had finally caught up with me. In my 20s, I could eat and drink whatever I wanted, stay out late and not pay the price. But now I could barely get out of bed in the morning. I was a slug.

My work suffered. Personal relationships became strained. And my health deteriorated to the point where I endured back-to-back viral infections last December. That's when I knew I had to do something. I was 20 pounds overweight, I felt terrible, and my energy and outlook on life were at an all-time low. I had to get out of that vicious cycle.

So how did I begin losing pounds and gaining energy, looking and feeling better than ever before? How did I safely, naturally and inexpensively get back on the road to wellness? By maximizing my metabolism. With healthier habits, regular exercise and better nutrition, I gave my body's puttering, sputtering engine a tuneup and began rebuilding it into a high-performance, calorie-crunching power plant.

Get Your Motor Running

I started by visiting local libraries and checking out more than a dozen books on getting fit. Soon I gravitated toward the subject of metabolism-a catchall term for the body's manifold processes of converting oxygen and food into energy. Metabolism is what enables your cells, tissues and organs to perform the digestion, respiration, circulation and other functions that keep you alive. And how you five-whether you smoke or exercise, what you eat and drink, and how you handle stress--affects your metabolism.

That's right: For better or worse, you can alter your metabolism. Less than a third of your metabolic makeup is accounted for by genetic factors, says Eric T Poehlman, PhD, research chair in nutrition and metabolism at the University of Montreal. "The genetic contribution is probably on the order of 20 to 30 percent," he says. Your age, hormone levels, body fat and muscle ratios, and how you eat account for the rest.

Metabolism is measured in calories. You burn calories constantly, whether sleeping, digesting food, watching TV, or running a marathon. The more active you are, the more calories you burn. But no matter how active you are, between 60 and 70 percent of your calories are consumed daily while you are at rest, says Walter C. Willett, MD, chair of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and author of Fat, Drink and Be Healthy.

Check Under the Hood Increasing your resting or basal metabolic rate (BMR), Willett says, is critical to lowering your weight and raising your energy levels (see "Do the Math," p. 42, to calculate your BMR). "The actual calories you need will depend heavily on how active you are," he adds.

Each of us has unique genes and lifestyles, so two men or two women of identical weight and activity levels will have different BMRs and total calorie consumption. "There are many reasons why you and I respond differently to changes in eating or exercise patterns," says Poehlman. One way we differ is body temperature. The higher your temperature, the faster your metabolism. So let's see how hot your engine is running. If it's on the upper end of the acceptable range, you'll burn more calories.

Take your temperature as soon as you wake up in the morning. Place your thermometer by your bed the night before, and try to move as little as possible before and while you take your temperature. If you are a woman of child-bearing age, you should take your temperature on the second, third or fourth day of menstruation to get an accurate reading. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Metabolism Tune-Up
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.