Indian Firms under Pressure on Drug Patent Regime, as Global Majors Mount Lobbying

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), February 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

Indian Firms under Pressure on Drug Patent Regime, as Global Majors Mount Lobbying


New Delhi, Feb. 19 -- India is defending its patent regime more aggressively than ever before from attacks in the US that have come to define the state of ties between the two countries lately.

The first sign of this came at a US International Trade Commission hearing last week with a telling push-back from trade bodies from India.

They were supported by activists such as Medecins Sans Frontiers (Doctors without Borders), that have historically supported easy access to medicines, and US academics.

Together, they told the sixmember commission conducting the hearing that India was in compliance with world patent regime - Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights or TRIPS - or else someone would have dragged it to the WTO.

"Go for evidence based assessment and not perception-based (assessment)," Dilip Shah, director-general of Indian Pharmaceutical Alliance, told the commission.

India has decided to not appear before US bodies as a sovereignty issue.

US companies have been campaigning for tougher action against India alleging it was denying and violating world patent rules - TRIPS - specially in the pharmaceutical sector.

"It is not surprising that India is ranked at the bottom of the pile along with Ukraine," said Ranjit Shahani of Novartis, whose cancer drug Glivec was denied a patent in 2013.

Glivec and German major Bayer's Nexavar (another cancer drug), which India compulsorily licensed out to a local maker in 2012, drive the case against India.

At stake for the drug industry, however, is not just the Indian market - expected to be worth $55 billion by 2020, second only to the US in volumes - but other emerging markets. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Indian Firms under Pressure on Drug Patent Regime, as Global Majors Mount Lobbying
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.