Editor's Introduction: Honoring the Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration on Its 25th Anniversary

By Kolin, Philip C. | Southern Quarterly, October 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Editor's Introduction: Honoring the Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration on Its 25th Anniversary


Kolin, Philip C., Southern Quarterly


This special double issue honors one of Mississippi's, and the South's, most distinguished conferences-the Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration (NLCC) on the occasion of its silver anniversary. Inaugurated and zealously led all these years by Carolyn Vance Smith of Copiah-Lincoln Community College, the NLCC has also been co-sponsored by the Natchez National Historical Park for the twenty-three years of its history. The NLCC has contributed immensely to the promulgation of the arts in and the history of the South. Longtime Director of the Mississippi Council for the Humanities Cora Norman declared, without hesitation, that "The most successful program during my tenure was the NLCC." Howell Gamer, the former president of Copiah-Lincoln Community College, proclaimed that "The NLCC has done more for race relations in the Deep South than any other conference I know." Fittingly, Carolyn Smith was honored as "Woman of the Year" (2008) by the Natchez NAACP. Historian and critic Patti Carr Black rightfully lauded Smith for making the NLCC an exemplar of literary/cultural tourism; Douglas Chambers, the previous editor of the Southern Quarterly, hailed the NLCC as a "remarkable public conference"; and Dean Steven R. Moser from Southern Miss's College of Arts and Letters has linked the NLCC to the Chautauqua renowned for their contributions to education in a pluralistic society.

The NLCC has accomplished all these things, and more. It not only analyzes, teaches, illustrates, and celebrates the South; it is the epitome of Southern culture in its hospitality, cuisine, fellowship, appreciation of Southern artists, musicians, and writers-novelists, poets, playwrights, screenwriters-and its commemoration of landscapes, monuments, and milestones. With its stately antebellum mansions and strategic place in Southern history, architecture, geography, and art, Natchez has been the perfect location for the conferences.

The breadth of themes/topics that the NLCC has featured over its twenty-five years is nothing short of phenomenal, as even a quick runthrough of Howell Gamer's year-by-year listing of them in Appendix B (pages 189-200) shows. Individually fascinating and collectively representative of the interdisciplinary research about the South, the Celebration's presentations have brought a multitude of distinguished speakers and artists to Natchez, and have earned rave reviews from funding agencies, civic leaders, scholarly organizations, and thousands of participants who pilgrimage to the NLCC each February. But while understandably essential to the NLCC's success, formal presentations are only one part of its conferences. Readings by actors and writers (including memoirists and storytellers), addresses by the recipients of the Richard Wright and Horton Foote Awards, films, guided tours, book signings, concerts, and musicals/plays also have contributed to the NLCC's cachet. John D. W. Guice, a historian from Southern Miss, revisits many of the events that have made the NLCC famous over the years in his personal history of the Celebration.

In editing this special issue, 1 strove to include work representing the variety of genres that the NLCC has incorporated in its programs, including scholarly papers, art exhibits, poetry readings, memoirs, tours, etc. Toward that end, this issue contains four essays originally read at the NLCC which their authors have readied for publication. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editor's Introduction: Honoring the Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration on Its 25th Anniversary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.