Archbishops Ralph d'Escures, William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bec. Heirs of Anselm and Ancestors of Becket

By Marritt, Stephen | The Catholic Historical Review, Winter 2014 | Go to article overview

Archbishops Ralph d'Escures, William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bec. Heirs of Anselm and Ancestors of Becket


Marritt, Stephen, The Catholic Historical Review


Archbishops Ralph d'Escures, William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bee. Heirs of Anselm and Ancestors of Becket. By Jean Truax. [The Archbishops of Canterbury Series.] (Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing. 2012. Pp. xii, 293. $39.95 paperback. ISBN 978-0-754-668-336.)

This book is one of a series on archbishops of Canterbury aimed at students, academics, and broader audiences, but the summary on the back cover does Truax and her subjects a disservice. None, as Truax makes very clear, was a "minor" archbishop nor were they "less noteworthy'" than others. Truax reminds us that these were three of the most important men in Anglo-Norman England, contextualizing their careers within narratives of the ecclesiastical and secular politics of their day, which, given their complexity, are admirably clear and straightforward. These are the first extended biographical studies of Ralph d'Escures and William of Corbeil to be published beyond the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and the introduction to English Episcopal Acta 28: Canterbury 1070-1136 (Oxford, 2004); both, however, have been the subject of unpublished dissertations. Denis BetheU's important articles on William are acknowledged, and Truax rightly makes considerable use of Avrom Saltman's exceptional biography of Theobald (London, 1956).

On the back cover, the archbishops' terms are presented as a "unified period," and a series editor notes that they "have never been considered together as a transition between two of Canterbury's greatest Medieval archbishops" before. This, although still too teleological, does better reflect the nature of the book, as Truax (to bring coherence to three very different archiépiscopal careers) picks out central themes of Lanfranc and Anselm's tenures and then traces their development through the terms of Ralph, William, and Theobald. Most prominent is what is here defined as a "Gelasian" model of practical cooperation between king and archbishop and in relations with the papacy, to which all three archbishops are considered to have consistently adhered as the relationship among church, state, and papal authority developed over the first half of the twelfth century. By the time St. Thomas Becket became archbishop in succession to Theobald, that model had been replaced by a "Gregorian" one in which bishops found themselves caught between traditional loyalty to kings and new commitments to a newly powerful papacy (although Theobald's relationship with King Henry II is less difficult and more Gelasian here than other recent research has suggested). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Archbishops Ralph d'Escures, William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bec. Heirs of Anselm and Ancestors of Becket
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.