About a Role and Value of Nonverbal Communication in Psycholinguistics

By Yildirim, Ilhan; Orazbekova, Zeine et al. | Asian Social Science, February 2014 | Go to article overview

About a Role and Value of Nonverbal Communication in Psycholinguistics


Yildirim, Ilhan, Orazbekova, Zeine, Unal, Yener, Asian Social Science


Abstract

Since the late 1970s, the problems of psycholinguistics were influenced by the state of affairs in linguistics and related sciences. This is primarily a complex of sciences about the nature and dynamics of cognitive processes. For most American and English-speaking psycholinguists N. Chomsky's theory of generative grammar as a reference to the language science is the most influential. They try to verify the extent of psychological hypotheses based on Chomsky's theory corresponding to the observed behavior. From this perspective, some authors consider the child's speech, the other-the role of language in social interactions, and others-the relationship of language and cognitive processes. The aim of our study is to determine and describe the characteristic and distinguishing features of non-verbal communication of Turkic culture and compare the data and if possible give them an interpretation.

Keywords: psycholinguistics, linguistics, non-verbal communication

1. Introduction

The globalization of the world's cultural process, mass migration and interpenetration of different languages and cultures (multiculturalism), the emergence of global computer networks-these factors have given particular weight to study the processes and mechanisms of mastering a foreign language. This greatly expanded the understanding of the areas of knowledge and research interests which overlap with psycholinguistics. This science is rapidly developing. The term "psycholinguistics" entered the academic community since 1954, after publishing CH. Osgood and T. Sebeka's article in the USA. But the ideas that are close to the problems of psycholinguistics, emerged and developed much earlier. It can be assumed that the psycholinguistic perspective of language learning actually existed long before the term "psycholinguistics" was coined by a group of American scientists.

Since the late 1970s, the problems of psycholinguistics were influenced by the state of affairs in linguistics and related sciences. This is primarily a complex of sciences about the nature and dynamics of cognitive processes. For most American and English-speaking psycholinguists N. Chomsky's theory of generative grammar as a reference to the language science is the most influential. They try to verify the extent of psychological hypotheses based on Chomsky's theory corresponding to the observed behavior. From this perspective, some authors consider the child's speech, the other-the role of language in social interactions, and others-the relationship of language and cognitive processes. Developed on the different basis, psycholinguistics has acquired its interest in the person as a native speaker and a tendency to regard language as a dynamic system of speech (verbal behavior). According to many scholars, psycholinguistics has not yet become a science with clearly defined boundaries.

Psycholinguistics initially focused on the study of real processes of speaking and understanding "human language". The variety of language functions in society and its close ties with human mental activity makes interaction of linguistics and the relevant social and psychological sciences very flexible.

Application tasks were the factors to separate psycholinguistics as an independent research area. Psycholinguistics should not be regarded as a kind of linguistics or psychology. This is a complex science that relates to linguistics and psychology as well. Psycholinguistics primarily inherited their methods of investigation from psychology. Experimenting, method of linguistic experiments, observation and self-observation are frequently used as methods of Psycholinguistics investigation. The main trends in the development of modern linguistics are quite comparable with psycholinguistics trends. The concept of language has been changed. Earlier in the center of linguists' interest were linguistic resources (phonetic, grammatical, lexical), now it is clearly recognized that all of these language features are only formal tools in the process of communication. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

About a Role and Value of Nonverbal Communication in Psycholinguistics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.