More Women Taking Leadership Roles but Pace of Growth Remains Slow: Study

By Maurino, Romina | The Canadian Press, March 7, 2014 | Go to article overview

More Women Taking Leadership Roles but Pace of Growth Remains Slow: Study


Maurino, Romina, The Canadian Press


More women taking on leadership roles

--

TORONTO - More women have moved into senior leadership roles during the past five years, but there needs to be more awareness around issues of representation to speed up the changes, according to a Toronto-based report.

"It's certainly progress and it's moving in the right direction, but the pace of change over a five-year period is relatively slow," said Wendy Cukier, founder and director of the Diversity Institute at Ryerson University.

A study by the institute found that female representation in senior positions at major corporations in the Toronto area increased to 32.5 per cent in 2014 from 30.6 per cent in 2009.

But women remained underrepresented overall, along with those belonging to a visible minority, with that group's representation increasing to 4.2 per cent from 3.1 per cent in the same time period.

From 2009 to 2014, representation of women increased at a rate of 6.3 per cent overall, the report said.

"In many cases it's just that some companies haven't made this a priority. They haven't thought about it or they've relied on old excuses for why their boards and executive teams look they way they do," Cukier said.

"What we need to keep moving this forward is to force attention on the issue to continue to publish results and to encourage transparency."

Some companies have done a good job in promoting qualified women, she added, and there are efforts to raise awareness about the need for diversity in management and on board of directors.

The Ontario Securities Commission, for instance, is proposing that all TSX-listed businesses be required to disclose targets for the number of women in high-ranking positions as directors and executive officers.

It also wants companies to disclose how they find candidates for those positions. It doesn't include quotas, but it is asking for a "comply or explain'' policy, which means companies will have to explain why their boards look the way they do.

According to the Ryerson study, the number of women in senior leadership positions varies by sectors.

The corporate sector continues to have the lowest proportion of women among its senior leadership, at 19. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

More Women Taking Leadership Roles but Pace of Growth Remains Slow: Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.