The Common Core Standards as Applied to the Common Core Standards

By Kane, Sharon | Language Arts, March 2014 | Go to article overview

The Common Core Standards as Applied to the Common Core Standards


Kane, Sharon, Language Arts


I have been called subversive, but I deny it. When I am invited to provide professional development related to implementing the Common Core State Standards, I welcome the opportunity. I often encounter teachers who resent both the Standards and the more or less mandated professional development, causing initial resistance. I try to allay anxiety by assuring them that their successful pre-CCSS ways of teaching do not have to be abandoned. For example, I lead sessions on the shifttoward using a higher percentage of nonfiction without abandoning the use of fiction. When teachers of other disciplines offer great literary nonfiction related to curricular topics, the perceived problem is no longer an issue.

Or, how about their objections to having to teach close reading using short expository texts? Again, not a problem. Intriguing informational articles about young adult literature can be read closely; students can be taught to state claims about major points, explicitly sharing evidence from the texts leading to their conclusions. I have modeled this practice using "What Is Steampunk, and Do I Want It in My Library?" (Rozmus, 2011). There's a vocabulary word right in the title some know they'll have to figure out from context if it isn't defined directly. We discuss the structure of the piece, the stance of the author, and other things the Standards advocate. …

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