A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

By McDavid, Jodi | Journal of Religion and Film, January 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night


McDavid, Jodi, Journal of Religion and Film


If the information that this is "the first Iranian vampire film" doesn't pique your interest, don't worry, there's more to this tale than a straightforward horror flick. Shot in black and white cinematography, each shot is beautiful, reminiscent of both spaghetti westerns and Hitchcock at times, and making it an overall pleasure to watch.

The action takes place in "Bad City," a place with some post-industrial desolation and an almost blasé attitude about death, drugs and violence. In the first five minutes, the protagonist, a young man whose father is a drug addict, walks past a gully filled with bodies without so much as turning his head.

It is quickly established that Arash is a good son, holding a job and taking care of his father. But, pushed to steal due to his father's debt to the local drug dealer, it becomes clear that he is on a precipice, and potentially moving into a future path in petty crime.

It is at this point that he meets The Girl, a slight young woman, wearing black and white and religious head covering. When asked, "Are you religious or something?," she replies, no; but religious or not, she is the moral core of the film. The Girl appears when people are about to be victimized.

Drug dealers, addicts, and prostitutes are judged harshly by her. Those with pure intents and morals are guided, not gently, but disturbingly, as she threatens them and tells them to remain good. Here we also see a vampire who is pensive, reflective, and feels guilty. She is beautiful and young in one minute, and old and wise the next. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.