Assessment of the Opinion of Youths on the Use of Sports and Vocational Education for Crisis Management in the Niger Delta Region

By Ejobowha, Thomas Boye; Erhinyodavwe, Johnson Ighowho et al. | International Journal of Psychological Studies, March 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Assessment of the Opinion of Youths on the Use of Sports and Vocational Education for Crisis Management in the Niger Delta Region


Ejobowha, Thomas Boye, Erhinyodavwe, Johnson Ighowho, Oroka, Valentine Othuke, Atomatofa, Rachael, International Journal of Psychological Studies


Abstract

The study was carried out to assess the opinion of youths in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria on the use of sports and vocational education in crisis management. To effectively carry out the study, five null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The survey research design was used for the study. The sample for the study comprises of one thousand youths purposively sampled from the nine oil producing states commonly referred to as the Niger Delta region. A self generated questionnaire tailored towards a four point Likert type was used for gathering information. The reliability of the instrument was ascertained by a test-retest method using the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient and the reliability of 0.87 was ascertained. Percentages and mean were used in analysing the demographic data while Chi-square was used in testing the hypothesis at 0.05 level of significance. The result of the findings revealed that there is a significant relationship between sporting activities and crisis management. The study also revealed that there is a significant relationship between vocational skill acquisition through vocational education and crisis management. Age, level of education and parental background significantly influence the opinion of youths on the use of sports and vocational education for crisis management. It was recommended that government and well meaning Nigeria should help to provide facilities and vocational skill acquisition centres in the Region.

Keywords: youths, crisis management, sports, vocational education, Niger Delta

1. Introduction

1.1 Background to the Study

The Niger Delta region of Nigeria which comprises of Delta, Edo, Rivers, Bayelsa, Cross Rivers, Ondo, Akwa-Ibom, Abia and Imo states are known for its natural deposit of mineral resources especially crude oil. The region has a coastline of 560km, which occupies two-thirds of Nigeria's coastline. It has a geographical size of 70,000 sq km (7.5 percent of Nigeria's total) and a population of 30 million people located in 3,000 communities and spread over 40 ethnic groups who speak 250 different dialects. It boasts of nineteen billion barrels of oil reserves and 166 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (Akpabio, 2009). In the past three to four decade, the region has been on the forefront in the economic sustenance through the derivation from crude oil. It is on record that the main source of revenue to the nation is in the production and export of the crude oil being extracted from the region.

The Niger Delta region has drawn the attention of the entire world in recent time due to what was termed "Niger Delta crisis". The crisis degenerated to hostage taking of foreigners and non foreigners alike. The crises came to its climax in the late 90s to the mid 20s precisely between 1999- 2008 when even classroom teachers were taken as hostages for ransom. These were checkmated with the introduction of the amnesty programme by the late President Yar'Adua in 2009 were majority of the youths in the Niger Delta region embraced and accepted the amnesty offer. Massive weapons of destructions were surrendered and handed to the Federal Government of Nigeria. The government came up with the amnesty programme but was faced with a lot of challenges. Although the programme is at the post amnesty stage, that is, the stage of rehabilitation and integration, a lot needed to be done.

The stage, at which the programme is presently, needs experts in crisis management, sociologist, psychologist, and professionals in conflict resolution to intervene. Others that must not be neglected are educationists, practical skill acquisition experts, and Information Communication Technology (ICT) experts. Despite the fact that the amnesty programme is at the rehabilitation and integration stage, majority of the youths and adults in the region have resorted to hostage taking for ransom in recent times This ugly trend calls for scholarly researches for a more sustainable programme that will help integrate, rehabilitate and redirect the attention of those who are more likely to be involved in this criminal acts of hostage taking, pipeline vandal, and other forms of crisis in other to make them useful and be productive to the region and the nation at large. …

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