Letters to the Editor

Honolulu Star - Advertiser, April 10, 2014 | Go to article overview

Letters to the Editor


JPAC lab can't ID what it doesn't have

Regarding your editorial concerning the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command ("Plans to overhaul POW/MIA command necessary, overdue," Star-Advertiser, Our View, April 3), the JPAC Central ID Lab (CIL) pioneered the use of DNA in the identification of human remains.

Ever since it became available in the late 1990's, DNA analysis has been an integral part of the CIL's identification process.

The problem isn't the CIL management or the use of DNA analysis. The problem is that those responsible for locating remains of the missing have failed. The CIL has nothing to do with locating remains.

Of the 25,000-35,000 potentially recoverable remains, in the current fiscal year only a handful of accessions containing even a fragment of human remains has come into the CIL. All of these accessions -- 100 percent -- were located by third parties who have nothing to do with JPAC's operations.

Making an ID, with or without DNA, can take as little as a month. But the CIL can't ID what it doesn't have.

The CIL scientific staff's innovations and use of DNA have set standards that are studied and adapted by labs around the world.

Frank Metersky Boynton Beach, Fla.

Sex education must be age-appropriate

Now that the Hawaii Democratic machine and the gay community have forced their agenda of legalized gay marriage upon the state of Hawaii, ignoring what the majority of the state voted on (marriage between one man and one woman), they are now focusing their attention on our children.

The gay community wanted and was granted its "civil rights," but that does not seem to be enough. Now they want to educate our children.

I stand with state Rep. Bob McDermott when he says enough is enough. Leave the children alone. There is a thing called age-appropriate education.

Sex education of any type should start at home, then be reinforced in the higher grades when it can be better understood.

To the teachers who took the training to present this lifestyle, I say, "Shame on you."

Parents, you should speak out against this.

Quintin Bibbs Aiea

Prisons and jails do not rehabilitate

Our society's criminal justice system is a failure.

Recidivism is sky high. There is no rehabilitation. There are only overcrowded institutes of higher criminal education. We call them prisons.

As tough-on-crime advocates push for longer and harsher criminal sentences, society has learned to feed upon itself. With the birth of private prisons and the expansion of state and federal institutions, prisons and the criminal justice system have become big business.

The truth is, prisons and jails are dungeons, and rehabilitation in such an atmosphere is an exercise in futility. …

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