Circus Upstaged Nation-Building

Winnipeg Free Press, May 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Circus Upstaged Nation-Building


Clowns, acrobats bigger draw than politicians in 1864

When a delegation of politicians from Central Canada arrived in Charlottetown in the summer of 1864 to discuss the idea of uniting Britain's North American colonies, only one representative of the Prince Edward Island government was available to greet them.

Everyone else in the tiny capital of 7,000, it seemed, had run off to see the circus.

Slaymaker and Nichols' Olympic Circus was the first travelling show to visit the Island in 20 years, and the serious business of nation-building had to compete with the antics of clowns, acrobats and trained monkeys.

The 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference is being marked with a summer of festivals, fireworks and music -- country superstar Shania Twain is taking a break from her Las Vegas show to headline a concert -- to rival anything Slaymaker and Nichols could stage.

This week's one-day royal visit by Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall was part of a P.E.I. 2014 celebration that promises to boost the all-important tourism industry. And this outpouring of pride in the Island's role as "the Cradle of Confederation" comes a year before Premier Robert Ghiz and his Liberal government face a fixed-date election, expected in the fall of 2015.

Ghiz, whose father, Joe, served two terms as premier, looks like a shoo-in for a third term. He holds 23 of 27 seats in the legislature and the latest survey by Halifax's Corporate Research Associates pegs Liberal support at better than 50 per cent among decided voters. The NDP has elected only one candidate in 40 years but stands in second place at 22 per cent while support for the Progressive Conservatives -- a party beset by internal divisions and looking for a new leader -- has dwindled to 17 per cent.

Despite the NDP's abnormally high showing in the polls (support peaked at 32 per cent last summer), observers have long complained of a democratic deficit in Island politics. Power shifts from the Liberals to the PCs and back again, with the party in power enjoying a lopsided majority and weak opposition until the pendulum swings in the opposite direction.

Last week an editorial writer with the Charlottetown Guardian grumbled about the government's "bare-bones budget" and the spring session's "light legislative agenda," but for now the pendulum is solidly on Ghiz's side. His government has steered clear of major controversies and appears to be on track to balance the books by 2016. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Circus Upstaged Nation-Building
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.