Developing Corporate Culture in a Training Department: A Qualitative Case Study of Internal and Outsourced Staff

By Yap, Querubin S.; Webber, Jon K. | Review of Business & Finance Studies, January 1, 2015 | Go to article overview

Developing Corporate Culture in a Training Department: A Qualitative Case Study of Internal and Outsourced Staff


Yap, Querubin S., Webber, Jon K., Review of Business & Finance Studies


ABSTRACT

This qualitative case study was conducted to investigate and analyze the perceptions and lived experiences of 20 training department staff at a New York-based early childhood multi-service healthcare company. The study was used to discover the leadership practices involved in creating a positive corporate culture in a work environment with outsourced and internal employees working concurrently together. There were six emergent themes that resulted from the study. It was discovered in the study that leaders who do the following activities continually engage the employees, whether they are internal or outsourced: (1) lead to the specific needs of each staff, whether internal or external, (2) create an environment of "fun", (3) create an environment that purports familial ties with all team members, (4) ensure that learning exists continually, (5) honor the employees who have worked in the industry the longest, and most importantly, (6) lead as a socially and emotionally intelligent leader.

JEL: L2, M1

KEYWORDS: Outsourcing, Training, Internal Employees, Outsourced Employees

INTRODUCTION

The challenge of leadership in an organization with an outsourcing arrangement continues to be more complex with the introduction of new technologies into the outsourcing solutions ("Goolsby, 2010), as well as the increase in multi-cultural and multi-generational employees and contractors into the workplace (McCray, 2008). There are organizations that are able to navigate the complex outsourcedintemal employee environments with success. In 2011, a Chief Financial Officer of the Year award was given to a New York-based early childhood multi-service healthcare company (Long Island Business News, 2011).

The acceptance speech of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) became the impetus to the current study since the CFO indicated a correlation between leader's impact on corporate culture in an environment with outsourced and internal employees resulting in positive employee satisfaction and profitability of the company (G. Vellios, personal communication, November 22, 2011). The researchers in the current study identified the need to discover the leadership factors that can be cultivated to create a positive working environment when outsourced and internal employees co-exist. With the sensitive information and confidential files surrounding children's services, the organization will be anonymously identified in the study.

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the leadership culture of a multi-service New York-based early childhood healthcare provider. Leadership practices influencing the corporate culture of a training department with an outsourcing-internal employee arrangement was uncovered in the study. The experiences of 20 training department staff were explored and analyzed through a convenience sample. The study can be used to examine: (a) leadership decision making, (b) management practices in relation to the workplace, and (c) the training department's corporate culture.

The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. The next section describes the relevant literature on outsourcing. Next, we will discuss the data and methodology used in the study. The results are presented in the following section. The paper closes with some concluding comments.

LITERATURE REVIEW

The literature in the study covered four topics: (a) development of training from traditional learning into corporate universities, (b) evolution of outsourcing and its link to training, (c) leadership and a leader's role in a training environment, and (d) corporate culture.

The focus of the current research was to discover linkages between the experiences and insights of a training staff and their leaders to determine how a positive corporate culture exists in a working environment with both outsourced and internal employees working concurrently. The majority of literatures utilized for the purposes of this research were published between 2007 to 2012. …

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