Self-Assessment of Teaching Effectiveness of Chemistry Teachers in Secondary Schools

By Bandele, Samuel Oye; Oluwatayo, James Ayodele | Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies, April 2014 | Go to article overview

Self-Assessment of Teaching Effectiveness of Chemistry Teachers in Secondary Schools


Bandele, Samuel Oye, Oluwatayo, James Ayodele, Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies


Abstract

The study investigated self-assessment of teaching effectiveness of Chemistry teachers in secondary schools. Participants were 103 teachers (male=47, female=56) selected from 86 out of 184 public secondary schools in Ekiti State using stratified random sampling technique. The instrument for collecting data was a self-constructed Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire, divided into two parts. Part 1 dealt with biodata including gender (male/female) and teaching experience in years defined as Low (0-5), Average (6-15) and High (16+). Part II contained 30 items clustered into seven categories ranging from teacher's personality to teacher's evaluation skills, each item rated on a five-point scale: Excellent=5, Very Good=4, Good=3, Fair=2 and Poor=1, with reliability coefficient=0.813 using Cronbach-α . Data were analysed using means, standard deviations, t-test and One-way ANOVA tested at 0.05 level of significance. Results showed that teachers' self-assessment of teaching effectiveness in Chemistry was very good, female teachers rated their teaching effectiveness in Chemistry higher than the males while experience had no significant influence on self-assessment of teaching effectiveness. It was recommended that teachers should justify their self-assessment of teaching effectiveness by transforming their pedagogical and evaluation skills into reality for the optimum benefits of students in Chemistry.

Keywords: self-assessment, teaching effectiveness, teachers, chemistry.

INTRODUCTION

Studies on evaluation or assessment of teaching effectiveness and its related constructs have prominence in literature (e.g. Fitzpatrick, 2004; Berk, 2005; Salsali, 2005; Ross & Bruce, 2007; Barry, 2010; Maja, 2012; Oluwatayo, 2013). Teaching effectiveness itself is defined by Senate Committee on Teaching and Learning (SCOTL), York University (2000) as activity which brings about the most productive and beneficial learning experiences for students and motivates their development as learners. The crux of the matter, however, is the question of what constitutes teaching effectiveness that can bring about the most productive learning experiences and its measure.

Incidentally, in listing some categories of variables that constitute teaching effectiveness, Cruickshank (1990) includes the teacher's traits, what the teacher knows, what the teacher teaches, what the teacher expects, how the teacher teaches, how the teacher reacts to students, and how the teacher manages the classroom. Similarly, the Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED) (1995) lists some general teaching factors that are associated with teaching effectiveness including good subject knowledge, good questioning skills, an emphasis upon instruction, good time management, a balance of grouping strategies, clear objectives, effective planning, good classroom organisation and effective use of other adults in the classroom.

Interestingly, Darling-Hammon (2000) suggests some salient attributes that are associated with teaching effectiveness, including:

1. strong general intelligence and verbal ability that helps teachers to organise and explain ideas, observe and think diagnostically;

2. strong content knowledge up to a threshold level that relates what is to be taught;

3. knowledge of how to teach others in that area, particularly, how to use hands-on learning technique such as laboratory work in science and manipulating in Mathematics, and to develop higher order thinking skills;

4. an understanding of learners and their learning and development including how to assess and scaffold learning, how to support students who have learning difficulties, and how to support the learning of language and content for those who are not already proficient in the language of instruction;

5. adaptive expertise that allows teachers to make judgment about what is likely to work in a given content in response to students' needs.

Undoubtedly, the task of engaging teachers to assess their own teaching effectiveness on the basis of the above criteria, is a complex one. …

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