The Effects of Consumer Personality Types on the Attitudes and Usage of Self-Checkout Technology in the Retail Sector among 18-22 Years Old

By Jackson, Thomas W.; Parboteeah, Paul et al. | International Journal of Marketing Studies, April 2014 | Go to article overview

The Effects of Consumer Personality Types on the Attitudes and Usage of Self-Checkout Technology in the Retail Sector among 18-22 Years Old


Jackson, Thomas W., Parboteeah, Paul, Metcalfe-Poulton, Siobhan, International Journal of Marketing Studies


Abstract

The aim of the research is to understand the relationship between personality types and the use of self-checkout machines (SCO) in retail. Understanding this relationship will provide different perspectives of how and why consumers interact with this technology in order to implement the technology for improved use. This research presents the theory behind technology acceptance, consumer personalities, technology anxiety and human interaction before creating a questionnaire to understand the relationship between SCO use and personality types. The findings show a relationship between personality types and attitudes towards and usage of SCO. A number of situational factors are also found to have a significant effect on consumers' decision to use SCO, of which speed and item quantity had a greater influence on attitudes and usage than personality type. As one of the first papers comparing personality types and the adoption of self-checkout technology, it provides a unique insight into how such technologies are used in retail. By understanding how different personalities view, and use, self-checkouts, they will be better able to optimise the customer experience when preparing to leave the store, and ultimately encourage them to return later.Research already exists that looks at self-service technology in different situations but little research exists that looks specifically at self-checkouts in retail environments. This paper addresses that lack by not only looking at attitudes towards self-check-outs, but also comparing those attitudes to personality types.

Keywords: kiosks, personality types, retail, self-checkout technology, technology adoption

1. Introduction

The automation of retail transaction has become increasingly common since the introduction of the automated teller machine (ATM) several decades ago. Self-service technology (SST) has continued to grow in the form of online banking, information kiosks, self-service petrol stations, and self-service machines in retail. As technologies continue to grow and become part of our daily lives, it is important to understand consumer reactions and willingness to adopt these new self-service technologies (Meuter et al., 2003). SST's are technological interfaces that enable customers to carry out tasks themselves without the assistance of an employee (Meuter et al., 2000). The notion of a service encounter usually creates an image of face-to-face interaction between a customer and an employee of a firm (Bitner, 1990). This image is now changing (Makarem et al., 2009) as advances in technology have created a surge in self-service technology options (Dabholkar et al., 2003). The growth in these self-service technologies could be a result of increased labour costs mixed with innovations in technology (Dabholkar, 1996).

Meuter et al. (2000) describes different types of SST's which are used for different purposes such as customer service, transactions, or self-help. These include telephone-based technologies, internet technologies, interactive free-standing kiosks, and CD technologies. Telephone-based technologies include telephone banking, support lines, mobile top-up, and telephone booking. Internet technologies can range from internet shopping and banking, to tracking packages, e-learning, and information searching. Interactive kiosks can be found in the form of ATMS, pay at the pump, and tourist information machines. Although some of these technologies have benefited customers, such as ATM's being available 24/7 and self-checkout's saving time, they have also been noted to cause frustration and dissatisfaction amongst customers (Parasuraman, 2000). Meuter et al. (2000) explains that because of the huge growth and wide variety of types of SST's, it is critical to understand customer's reactions to them, how they use them, and if they will use them in the future.

SCO's are interactive kiosks which allow customers to scan, pack, and pay for goods either by themselves or with little assistance from staff (Lee et al. …

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