First Steps in the Journey from Consumers to Producers of Research in Deaf Education

By Gardiner-Walsh, Stephanie; Kemmery, Megan et al. | American Annals of the Deaf, Spring 2014 | Go to article overview

First Steps in the Journey from Consumers to Producers of Research in Deaf Education


Gardiner-Walsh, Stephanie, Kemmery, Megan, Compton, Mary, V, American Annals of the Deaf


The need for leadership personnel to fill faculty positions in special education is well documented (Sindelar & Tàylor, 1988; D. D. Smith, Pion, & Tyler, 2004; D. D. Smith, Robb, West, & Tyler, 2010; Woods & Snyder, 2009). Among the expectations of leaders in special education is that they possess the necessary skills to conduct high-quality, rigorous, evidence-based research that will increase the knowledge of effective interventions and services for children with special needs (D. D. Smith et al., 2010). This demand for well-prepared, research-focused, doctoral-level faculty to prepare teachers of children with disabilities extends to the study of lowincidence sensory disabilities, specifically, blindness/visual impairment (B/VT), being deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH), and deaf-blindness (DB; AmbrozeZaken & Bozeman, 2010; Antia, H. Johnson, Lenihan, & Benedict, 2009; Mason, Davidson, & McNerney, 2000). These areas of special education constitute a unique constellation of exceptionality in that vision and hearing are the primary senses through which individuals initiate and maintain social contact and through which students acquire academic content.

Concern about the need for rigorous, research-based practices in teaching children with hearing loss has been voiced since the 1988 recommendations of the Commission on Education of the Deaf, in which it specifically noted the need to improve the quantity and quality of such research (Commission on Education of the Deaf, 1988). In a national survey of leadership personnel needs in deaf education, LaSasso and Wilson (2000) found that the applicant pool for faculty positions in teacher preparation programs in deaf education between 1998 and 2000 was rated overall as unsatisfactory. In particular, the surveyed programs highly ranked course content and experience in the areas of quantitative and qualitative research methods as requirements of desirable applicants. However, the survey results indicated that most applicants did not meet such requirements. Thus, the quality of prospective leadership faculty in deaf education has become an issue of concern.

An analysis by Schirmer (2008) of the lack of scholarly productivity of faculty in teacher preparation programs in deafness between 2002 and 2008 gave additional urgency to the call for leadership preparation in deaf education that focused on preparing researchers in deafness. Schirmer observed that doctoral preparation programs in deafness, as well as in special education, should (a) strengthen course work in research methodology and (b) provide mentoring for doctoral students by expert researchers. Concern about the lack of leadership preparation in deaf education that emphasizes research expertise also surfaces in interviews that were conducted with 48 directors of teacher preparation programs (Benedict, H. Johnson, & Antia, 2011). The majority of the directors who were interviewed indicated that strong pedagogical skills as well as strong communication and collaboration skills were more highly desired than a prospective faculty member's experience in grant writing, research, and publishing. However, the findings of Benedict et al. (2011) emphasize that prospective faculty in deaf education should be prepared to generate evidence-based research on how to provide instruction and support for students with hearing loss to ensure that they acquire knowledge and skills equal to that of their hearing peers. Thus, the shortage of leadership personnel in deaf education who possess expertise in how to conduct rigorous research is a serious challenge for doctoral preparation programs in deafness.

National Leadership Consortium in Sensory Disabilities

In preservice teacher education, specializations in low-incidence sensory disabilities (e.g., deafness, visual impairment, deaf-blindness) often have small class sizes and peer groups due to these fields' focus on populations that are, by definition, limited in number. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

First Steps in the Journey from Consumers to Producers of Research in Deaf Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.