Analysis of Job Stress, Psychosocial Stress and Fatigue among Korean Police Officers

By Jeon, Woojin; Lee, Haekag et al. | Iranian Journal of Public Health, May 2014 | Go to article overview

Analysis of Job Stress, Psychosocial Stress and Fatigue among Korean Police Officers


Jeon, Woojin, Lee, Haekag, Cho, Jaehwan, Iranian Journal of Public Health


Dear Editor-in-Chief

Stress is known to be associated with almost all of the diseases of experienced by humans, including various physical diseases. Studies show that job stress occurring while in service has negative ef- fects on physical, mental, behavioral and emo- tional aspects of health, and worsens diseases and risk factors (1). In addition to the relationship be- tween job stress and disease, police officers' stress continues to be studied, and Arter's study over- seas shows that stress is related to police officers' deviant accidents (2).

This study showed that police officers' job stress level was at 47.96±9.2 points, while other papers using the KOSS, for example, Kim Hae-ran's study, using a short form of KOSS, showed that police officers' job stress was at 60.02±2.49 points (3), and the study by Son et al. showed that stress was at 2.4221 on a 4-point scale, which was 60.5 points if it is converted into a 100-point scale. Such gaps seem to be related to the characteristics of the subjects in this study, who were advanced in age, experienced in organizational life, had an interest in welfare policy, and therefore, they seemed to have benefited. Fire officers who are similar to police officers in many ways showed a job stress level of 48.60±9.892, which was close to the level that was found in this study, when the KOSS was applied.

In this study, the overall average and standard deviation of psychosocial stress (PWI-SF) was 21.34±6.61, while the overall average and standard deviation of fatigue (MSF) was 80.98±17.65. A local past study of fire officers similar to the one done on police officers in many ways showed that the overall average of psychosocial stress (PWI- SF) was 22.4±7.122), while a study of fatigue in domestic workers. There have been varying results on the relationship between age and fatigue, with no significant difference shown for those from age 18 to 50 but a decrease for women under the age of 50 (4) shown, and significantly high fatigue for women, and younger, unmarried and highly educated people (5). This study showed that there was no association between age and job stress, psychosocial stress and fatigue, respectively. This seems to be a result of the differences in the population and the classification standard between this study and existing studies. In particular, this study had an age distribution in which people aged in their 50s were dominant, and there were limita- tions in getting information because the subjects were in the hospital.

This study showed that smokers had significantly higher stress levels than non-smokers, which was a similar result to other studies reporting that non- exercisers had significantly higher stress levels than exercisers. …

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