Interviewing Families for Effective Transition to Employment

By Hutchins, Margaret P.; Renzaglia, Adelle | Teaching Exceptional Children, March/April 1998 | Go to article overview

Interviewing Families for Effective Transition to Employment


Hutchins, Margaret P., Renzaglia, Adelle, Teaching Exceptional Children


Questions like these can help parents frame their concerns and beliefs about their sons and daug*iters as they participate in plans for their children's future lives, particularly their future employment.

We have developed a process, the Family Vocational Interview, that can assist special educators and transition specialists as they work with students like Julie and Robbie and their families to plan vocational experiences (Renzaglia et al., 1995). This process, which can begin when students are 12 years old, assists in decisions associated with selecting work experiences and long-term job placements for students with moderate and severe disabilities (see box, page 74, "A Mini-Survey of Transition").

In this article, we share the interview format that professionals at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and nearby public schools designed and used to engage families in dialogue regarding the vocational programming for their sons and daughters with disabilities (see box, page 76, "Collaboration and Implementation").

We also provide recommendations for conducting the interview, as well as integrating the procedures into students' longitudinal transition planning process. Figure 1 shows sample questions and formats for the interview process, and Figure 2, page 75, shows a reduced copy of the actual instrument.

Interview as Exploration: Format and Content

The Family Vocational Interview serves as a guide for communicating with family members and exploring their concerns and issues related to current and future vocational instruction and experiences. It is designed to assess family input on a continuous basis and document changes in the perspectives, goals, ambitions, needs, and concerns indicated by the family and student with disabilities as the student progresses through his or her educational program.

The questionnaire has six parts: parental expectations, experience and preference, personal needs, family support, transportation, and wages and benefits.

Parental Expectations

The first questions help determine family members' goals and attitudes toward future employment for their child. We designed the questions to stimulate a discussion of the family's expectations and vision of their son's or daughter's work training program, as well as their employment outcomes on graduation from school.

Specific questions focus on the following issues:

The student's current responsibilities at home and how he or she spends time after school and in the summer.

What interest family members have in the student's employment for the future.

Anticipated residential accommodations after graduation.

Available resources to assist the student, if needed.

The preferred amount of time to be spent on a job (i.e., number of hours and months).

The information obtained provides an insight into the family's priorities for their child and the importance that they place on employment goals for the future.

Experiences and Preferences

The second set of questions focuses on the previous work experiences in which the student may have participated and the family's perspective about and satisfaction with those experiences. This discussion provides insights into a student's work history and allows the family to share their likes and dislikes about these experiences.

In addition, the interviewer continues to assess the family's perception of preferred employment experiences for the future. Questions attempt to reveal information related to family and individual preferences for the types of industry or actual jobs, as well as specific tasks that could assist in identifying appropriate positions for work experience or long-term employment.

Personal Needs

Information regarding the personal care or communication needs of a person with disabilities is vital to the appropriate selection of work experiences or a job placement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interviewing Families for Effective Transition to Employment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.