Morbid Jealousy-And Conjugal Murder in Israel

By Sigal, Mircea | The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, January 1, 1998 | Go to article overview

Morbid Jealousy-And Conjugal Murder in Israel


Sigal, Mircea, The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences


In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of women murdered by their spouses in Israel. Morbid jealousy has been diagnosed in over one-third of these murders (1).

The terms "morbid jealousy," "pathological jealousy," "sexual jealousy," "psychotic jealousy," "conjugal paranoia" and "Othello syndrome" all have been proposed to describe delusions of infidelity.

When it occurs in pure form it may be regarded as a special variety of paranoia, the so-called Kraepelin's "true paranoia" (2). This jealousy is encapsulated (limited to one delusion only, while all other cognitive functions remain unharmed).

The feeling of jealousy could be compared to an iceberg whose base might be wide and spread, yet it is unknown and unidentified clinically. In fact, this hidden jealousy is examined and diagnosed only when it comes to the surface, and expressed in violent and aggressive behavior towards the spouse.

Morbid jealousy appears to be a crossculturally universal trait, but with variability between and within cultures. The special characteristics of Israeli society could partially account for the rise in the number of women murdered in Israel in the 1990s.

Israeli society has been in the first place in the world in the number of immigrants absorbed in the last decade. In fact, it is the only society, in the 20th century, whose population has grown by 25% through immigration in 10 years only.

The highest rate of murder cases in the family among Jews is in families coming from Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union. Among the Ethiopians the rate of murder cases is 10 times their percentage in the overall population.

What are the reasons for these high numbers ?

The process of adjustment and absorption in a new culture is a very difficult one. The difficulties which most new immigrants have to cope with may intensify the violence which used to exist in their country of origin.

2. Ethiopian Jews live in closed communities, following the social norms and customs of a patriarchal tribe as they existed in Ethiopia. The family unit is as patriarchal as it was in Ethiopia, with large gaps in status between the man and the woman.

3. The tendency to suspicion, which is more prevalent in totalitarian societies, still exists in the families of immigrants coming from the former Soviet Union.

4. Among immigrants from the former Soviet Union, alcohol is an important factor which accounts for increased aggressiveness within the family.

The data referring to the murder of Moslem women by their spouses are inaccurate as many of these murders are reported as accidents or suicides. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Morbid Jealousy-And Conjugal Murder in Israel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.