Halifax & Its Proud Maritime History

By McLaren, Robert | Sea Classics, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Halifax & Its Proud Maritime History


McLaren, Robert, Sea Classics


A city steeped in its rich maritime heritage pays tribute to its proximity to the sea with a magnificent maritime museum complex

Halifax has always been and still is a sailor's town. It is also a very good city for tourists, who arrive by plane, automobile and cruise ship. The city was founded in 1749 by Governor Edward Cornwallis along with 2500 settlers. Halifax was known as a strategic location because of its ice free harbor.

The famed Citadel was built by the British to counteract the growing strength of the French in North America. The star-shaped fortress (the fourth built on the site) was built between 1828 and 1856. It has a commanding view of the city and its harbor looking over the old historic, as well as the new buildings along the water front. It was one of the largest British forts built on the continent. This massive-looking fort is one of the major reasons Halifax was never attacked.

During the 18th and 19th centuries the city was crowded with brawling military soldiers, sailors, privateers as well as adventurers seeking their fortune in the new world. The Citadel is open from early May to the end of October with guides dressed in period clothes giving tours.

Today, the Citadel is Canada's most visited National Historic site. Halifax continues to have heavy international ship traffic due to its ice-free harbor. Its clean streets have fine international restaurants, good pubs, shops, galleries and is a friendly city to visit, day or night.

PIER 21

Another National Historic site, Pier 21 is the last remaining immigration shed (dock) in Canada. From 1928 to 1971 more than one million immigrants, refugees, war brides and their children entered Canada at this pier, known as "Canada's Front Door." After going through immigration they set out to find new lives in Halifax or other Canadian cities and towns.

During World War Two, 494,000 soldiers, sailors and airmen left for overseas from here. The self-guided interpretive center, on the second floor takes you through the path an immigrant would follow. Audio and video exhibits lead you along the way. Available is a list of the 100 ships that most frequently arrived and departed between 1928 and 1971 and includes a data base of facts and pictures.

In the theater a 25-minute virtual projection is a feature presentation. You can view the deck where the Canadian Troops embarked for Europe during World War Two. Today, passenger ships debark tourists for a day of sightseeing in Halifax.

THE MARITIME MUSEUM OF THE ATLANTIC

The museum was founded in 1982 and is operated by the Province of Nova Scotia. It started in a small space at the HMC Dockyard where Canada's Naval artifacts would be preserved until a permanent location could be found. Today, it is in its permanent location in the historic building of the William Robertson & Son Ship Chandlery and A.M. Smith and Company on Lower Water Street.

The two-story museum has over 200,000 maritime artifacts making_ in the largest collection of various items in Canada's Maritime History. The ship Chandlery has been restored to its 19th century look and you can still smell the pine tar and manila rope. The collection includes a small carft gallery, ship models, the only known wooden deck chair from the Titanic and more. It is all well done and not to be missed when visiting Halifax. The Museum is open year-round.

THE CSS ACADIA

Located and maintained by the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic on its wharf. This hydrographic research vessel was launched in 1913 and has all the elegance of ships built in that era. During war time it was used as a Patrol Ship for the Royal Canadian Navy. The ship is still used to train students in methods of oceanographic research. CSS Acadia is the only ship remaining that served the Canadian Navy in both World Wars. This very well kept ship is worth a visit and is open from May to October.

HMCS SACKVILLE

Located on the south side of the finger pier adjacent to the CSS Acadia is the HMCS Sackville. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Halifax & Its Proud Maritime History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.