Impact of Student Engagement on Academic Performance and Quality of Relationships of Traditional and Nontraditional Students

By Courtner, Andrew | International Journal of Education, April 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Impact of Student Engagement on Academic Performance and Quality of Relationships of Traditional and Nontraditional Students


Courtner, Andrew, International Journal of Education


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the level of student engagement on academic performance and the quality of relationships with students, faculty, and administrative personnel of traditional and nontraditional students. This study sought to determine if there was a significant difference in academic performance of traditional and nontraditional college students based on the level of student engagement. The researcher examined data from both traditional and nontraditional students to consider the impact the level of student engagement had upon the quality of relationships with other students, faculty, and administrative personnel. Furthermore, the study sought to determine if there was a significant difference in the quality of relationships with other students, faculty, and administrative personnel between traditional and nontraditional college students. There was a significant difference between traditional and nontraditional students based on academic performance and level of student engagement. Traditional students had higher levels of student engagement; however, nontraditional students had higher levels of academic performance. Level of student engagement had a significant impact on the quality of relationships with other students, faculty, and administrative personnel for both traditional and nontraditional students. Specifically, level of student engagement had the greatest impact upon quality of relationships with faculty for both traditional and nontraditional students. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the quality of relationships with other students, faculty, and administrative personnel. Nontraditional students had the highest quality of relationships with faculty and administrative personnel, and traditional students had the highest quality of relationships with other students.

Keywords: student engagement, traditional student, nontraditional student, academic performance, quality of relationships

1. Introduction

The study of student engagement of college students during their educational and academic career has been a strong topic trending higher education. Extensive studies and research have been conducted on student engagement and the impact it may have upon the educational experience of the student (Astin, 1999; Kuh, 2005; Kuh, Kinzie, Buckley, Bridges, & Hayek, 2007). The term and theory of student engagement is first introduced as the theory of student involvement by Alexander Astin (1984). When first introduced, Astin provides the reasoning for five main purposes and key components of the student engagement/involvement phenomena. Astin (1984) defines student engagement as "the amount of physical and psychological energy that the student devotes to the academic experience" (p. 518). This definition is used in the current study to define the theory of student engagement.

Within recent years, researchers have analyzed the impact student engagement has upon the educational and academic experience of college students, specifically academic performance. There are numerous studies that analyze the impact of student engagement upon academic performance and quality of relationships for traditional college students. However, there is very limited research that looks at the student engagement process and its impact on academic achievement for nontraditional students. Previous research also has looked at the relationships between students and faculty; however, there is limited research on the quality of relationships with other students, the quality of relationships with faculty, and the quality of relationships with administrative personnel. This study was designed to fill in these missing portions of research and add to the body of knowledge in this area . 2. Literature Review

The age of today's undergraduate population is becoming extremely more and more diverse. Adults are attending for the first time or returning to college in record numbers as the undergraduate landscape is expanding beyond the traditional 18- to 22-year old students (Bauman et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Impact of Student Engagement on Academic Performance and Quality of Relationships of Traditional and Nontraditional Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.