Interviewing Successfully for Academic Positions: A Framework for Candidates for Asking Questions during the Interview Process

By Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Hwang, Eunjin | International Journal of Education, April 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Interviewing Successfully for Academic Positions: A Framework for Candidates for Asking Questions during the Interview Process


Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J., Hwang, Eunjin, International Journal of Education


Abstract

The interview perhaps is the most influential factor in the academic employment process. Although curriculum vitae, cover letters, and recommendations are essential aspects that typically determine whether the candidate will be invited for interview, the on-site interview typically is the final determining factor in the selection process. Hence, during the interview process, candidates should convey not only academic/professional strengths but also collegiality in an appropriate manner. Asking appropriate questions during academic interviews is essential in that it allows applicants to detect what is expected from departments or units and also provides applicants with valuable information to assess the best fit. However, an extensive review of the literature revealed no work that discussed explicitly the types of questions that interview candidates should pose. Thus, the major purpose of this article is to provide a framework for candidates who seek academic positions for asking questions during the interview process. In particular, typologies of interview questions are provided. Additionally, numerous questions are presented that are classified as being related to teaching, research, and service. Further, these questions are sub-divided into questions for search committee members, the department chairperson/unit leader, dean, and vice president/provost. Although the list is by no means exhaustive, it is hoped that it will help candidates view the academic interview as a two-way process in which both parties assume the joint role of interviewer and interviewee.

Keywords: interviewing, academic positions, job talk, interview preparation, interview questions, interview presentation, nonverbal communication

The interview perhaps is the most influential factor in the academic employment process. Although curriculum vitae, cover letters, and recommendations are essential aspects that typically determine whether the candidate will be invited for interview, the on-site interview typically is the final determining factor in the selection process (Kisamore, Casper, Martin, & Hall, 2004). Hence, during the interview process, candidates should convey not only academic/professional strengths but also collegiality in an appropriate manner.

Academicians involved in the interview process use the personal interview to confirm or to negate impressions conveyed by their curriculum vitae, supporting documents, and recommendations. University personnel also will attempt to assess the candidate's personality and to evaluate her/his potential as a professional colleague. These individuals take several aspects into account when deciding to recommend a candidate for an academic position, including communication skills, knowledge of subject area, enthusiasm, passion, and appearance.

Anxiety in the Job Interview Process

In the world of academe, interviews for faculty positions involve a multi-stage selection process that typically takes longer than is the case for most other job interviews (Ezell, 2002; Stasny, 2001). Indeed, these interviews often take at least one full work day and often go into a second day because interview candidates are expected to be interviewed by several members of the institution-from faculty members within the interview candidate's unit (e.g., department, college) to one or more representatives of the higher echelons of administration (e.g., university president, vice-president, provost) (Stasny, 2001). Consequently, anxiety is rife during academic job interviews (Young, Behnke, & Mann, 2004).

In the job interview situation, applicants are evaluated by interviewers who typically are strangers. Hence, the interviews generally are not under the applicant's control and the display of anxiety can be associated with negative outcomes (McCarthy & Goffin, 2004; Sieverding, 2009). According to Cook, Vance, and Spector (2000), applicants who display lower levels of anxiety are more likely to be invited for a second interview. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Interviewing Successfully for Academic Positions: A Framework for Candidates for Asking Questions during the Interview Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.