The Mother's Legacy in Early Modern England/English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500 - 1625/gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood

By Smith, Elizabeth J. | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2014 | Go to article overview

The Mother's Legacy in Early Modern England/English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500 - 1625/gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood


Smith, Elizabeth J., Anglican and Episcopal History


The Mother's Legacy in Early Modem England. Jennifer Heller. (Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2011, Pp ix, 234. $107.96); English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500 - 1625. Edited by Micheline White. (Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2011, Pp xiii, 252. $107.96); Gender and Early Modem Constructions of Childhood. Edited by Naomi J. Miller and Naomi Yavneh. (Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2011, Pp xv, 248. $109.96.)

These three volumes add to the growing Ashgate series, "Women and Gender in the Early Modern World." All, the authors make use of the tools of modern gender studies to explore a particular historical context through certain of its literary, religious, or artistic artefacts. Some but not all of those artefacts are texts by women. None are of the kind sought by an earlier generation of feminist scholars who hoped to retrieve and celebrate a hidden history of female agency or to praise subversive foremothers. Instead, the women, girls, and otherwise gendered bodies, lives, texts, and objects explored by the writers are deftly examined in their context of strongly stratified early modern culture, with its gender roles that slowly evolved and were only very occasionally resisted.

Jennifer Heller's The Mother's Legacy in Early Modem England is a monograph on a particular literary genre which has both manuscript and printed forms. Some legacies were bestsellers, and some were written by men. Others were passed down within families. All are written to children, use a maternal voice, and are cast in the form of deathbed advice. Many have strong echoes of other cultural traditions and muchcirculated texts about death and dying, while recasting this material in more emotionally charged ways appropriate to the persona of a dying mother. Legacies also offer religious advice, varied according to the period and the mother's protestant or catholic faith. Though many of the mothers who wrote such a legacy, memoir or blessing were classically educated, their piety rather than their education had to shine through. Girl-children received different advice from that offered to boys, upholding conventional gender hierarchies.

English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500 - 1625 collects ten chapters by different authors, grouped under the headings of "Women and Religious Communities" and "Reading Intertextual Prose Genres." It aims to recover, historicize, and theorize women's religious writing (4). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Mother's Legacy in Early Modern England/English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500 - 1625/gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.