Chronology: Lebanon

The Middle East Journal, Summer 2014 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Lebanon


See also Israel, Syria, Turkey

Feb. 3: A suicide bomber detonated explosives in a minibus during rush hour in Beirut suburb of Choueifat, killing himself and wounding several people. Although no group immediately claimed responsibility, Sunni militias involved in the fighting in Syria were reportedly behind many similar attacks. [BBC, 2/3]

Feb. 15: Prime Minister Tammam Salam formed a new 24-member cabinet, ending nearly 11 months of deadlocked talks. The cabinet was split between the Hizbullah-led pro-Syria March 8 Alliance and the rival, Western-leaning March 14 Alliance led by Sa'd al-Hariri. [BBC, 2/15]

Feb. 19: Two suicide bombers killed five people and wounded dozens, including children in a Beirut orphanage. The 'Abdullah 'Azzam Brigades, an al-Qa'ida- linked militant group, claimed responsibility for the attacks; it stated that it would continue attacks until Hizbullah withdrew its forces from Syria. [NYT, 2/19]

Feb. 24: Israeli warplanes carried out two air strikes in eastern Lebanon, near the Syrian border. Lebanon's National News Agency speculated that Israel targeted a weapons convoy to prevent the Syrian government from delivering missiles to Hizbullah. [BBC, 2/24]

Mar. 8: More than 5,000 demonstrators marched in Beirut on March 8, International Women's Day, to demand that Lebanon pass a law proscribing domestic violence. Lebanon had no existing law protecting women from violence by family members, and no official national statistics on domestic violence in Lebanon were available. [BBC, 3/8]

Mar. 14: The Israeli military fired into Lebanon in response to a bomb detonated against an Israeli Army vehicle on the Israel-Lebanon border. …

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