Chronology: Tunisia

The Middle East Journal, Summer 2014 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Tunisia


See also Libya

Jan. 29: Parliament approved Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa's new technocratic government by a vote of 149 out of 193 lawmakers during an overnight session. The new ministers were sworn in and replaced the Ennahda Movement-led administration after a deal to end political turmoil and prepare for new elections. [Daily Star, 1/29]

Feb. 4: The Tunisian National Guard killed Kamel Gadhgadhi and six other heavily armed men whom the government labeled as terrorists. Gadhagdhi was a senior member of Tunisia's banned Islamist group Ansar al-Shari'a and the suspected assassin of Tunisian opposition figure Chokri Bélaïd whose death sparked political turmoil. [Daily Star, 2/4]

Feb. 17: Over 1,000 protesters gathered in the town of Jendouba to protest terrorism and violence in response to the previous day's killings in which four Islamist militants dressed as security officers killed three policemen and a civilian in the Jendouba area of western Tunisia. The gunmen set up a roadblock and fired at cars and ultimately were not captured. [Daily Star, 2/17]

Feb. 21: Eleven Libyans died when their airplane crashed 25 miles south of Tunis after the airplane's engine caught fire. Three doctors, two people seeking medical treatment, and six crewmembers were on board. One of the patients who died was Miftah Dawudi, a member of Libya's government and a founder of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, which helped overthrow Mu'ammar al-Qadhafiin 2011. [Daily Star, 2/21]

Feb. 27: Riots continued for a third day in central Gafsa, approximately 200 miles south of Tunis, after a public environmental company announced the results of their recruitment process, from which the protesters felt unfairly excluded. Rioters burned tires, threw stones at police, set fire to the local office of the Ennahda Movement and a police office, and damaged a court building. Social unrest over joblessness had often led to violence in Tunisia. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Chronology: Tunisia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.