IRAQ-Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance

By Davis, Eric | The Middle East Journal, Summer 2014 | Go to article overview

IRAQ-Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance


Davis, Eric, The Middle East Journal


IRAQ Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyr- dom, and Remembrance, by Dina Rizk Khoury. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 298 pages. $85 cloth; $29.99 paper.

Dina Khoury's much anticipated study, Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom and Remembrance, fills an important lacuna in the history of modern Iraq. Iraq expe- rienced the 20th century's longest war in its eight-year conflict with Iran (1980-88). The war's devastation was exacerbated by the Gulf War of 1991, the subsequent March 1991 Intifada, and the UN sanctions regime (1991-2003). Following the 2003 US inva- sion, violent internecine warfare ravaged Arab Iraq until 2008. It is no exaggeration to say that Iraq has experienced the most de- structive warfare and violence of any coun- try in the Middle East during the last quarter of the 20th and beginning of the 21st century.

To have an in-depth study of the impact of war on Iraq is to be welcomed, especially one that is conceptually nuanced, thorough- ly researched and draws upon newly avail- able archives. As with Joseph Sassoon's excellent study, Saddam Hussein's Ba'th Party, the author relies heavily on the Iraq Memory Foundation Archives at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Professor Khoury is aware of the ethical issues in us- ing the archive, based on how it was trans- ferred to the United States, and sympathetic to Iraq's desire to have the archive returned. Nevertheless, she offers a cogent argument for the need to utilize its documents to gain insights into the functioning of Iraq's ancien regime, a position with which I fully agree.

In addition to new archival material, Pro- fessor Khoury relies on a large number of in- terviews with Iraqis who experienced the wars and violence of the 1980s and 1990s. These interviews are telling; they provide a human dimension to the official and dry tone of the memoranda written by the myriad agents of the Ba'thist regime's repressive bureaucracy.

Iraq in Wartime's first two chapters of- fer a history of the Iran-Iraq and Gulf wars and the 1991 Intifada that provides the nec- essary historical contextualization for the study, especially for the non-Iraq specialist. The subsequent chapters convey the results of the incredible effort that the regime orga- nized to oversee and control Iraq's citizenry during two wars and the UN sanctions re- gime (1991-2003). In these sections of the book, the extent to which authoritarian rule consistently seeks to document its oppres- sion is forcefully driven home.

The reader is not only impressed by the tremendous effort that was devoted to social control, but the waste of national resources that could have been used instead to promote Iraq's social and economic development. Having first conducted research in Iraq in May and June of 1980, I was repelled by Ba'thist authoritarianism, but nevertheless impressed by the tremendous development that was underway, including electrification of villages and efforts to eradicate women's illiteracy, even in remote villages. All this effort was subsequently subordinated to an unnecessary war that would ultimately, in 2003, leave Iraq in shambles.

One of Professor Khoury's most impor- tant contributions is to foreground three cam- paigns that were waged simultaneously dur- ing the Iran-Iraq War. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

IRAQ-Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.