Book Review: Internet Disability: Resources '98

By Dinneen, Terrance B. | Journal of Legal Economics, Fall 1997 | Go to article overview

Book Review: Internet Disability: Resources '98


Dinneen, Terrance B., Journal of Legal Economics


Terramce B. Dinneen*

Internet Disability Resources '98 by Mary Barros-Bailey and Dawn Boyd, Ahab Press, Inc., White Plains, New York, 1997.

For anyone with a forensics specialty that relates to disability, employability and economic loss, Internet Disability Resources '98 is a tool that provides guidance to obtaining a voluminous amount of information. This 479-page book with accompanying CD-ROM provides Internet sites on a wide variety of resources covering areas of forensic application for those individuals involved with economic loss consultation, loss of earning capacity, and employment issues. Web sites provide resources for hard to find, crucial information. The book is well arranged and easily cross-referenced to locate various materials. There are multiple web sites that cover subject matter in great detail. For example, there are sites for adaptive equipment that are cross-referenced from rehabilitation facilities to manufacturers as well as research and development institutions including the various universities that are involved in the engineering and development of adaptive equipment. Thus, when researching the cost or application of assistive technology, Internet Disability Resources '98 offers the user not only what is currently available, but also the facilities that have applied the assistive technology as well as the resources to review what is in development for the assistive technology.

Another section of the book related to education has numerous sites that can be used to assess and develop the issues that would confront the education of a child who must overcome a disability. These sites, again, cover special education links, new studies in special education and sites that lead to the current research topics in special education cross-referenced by the type of disability. There are a variety of sites that deal with recreational activities and the cost of adaptive equipment to allow the individual to continue to pursue recreational activity post-injury. These sites, again, are crossreferenced by interest, disability and a summary of various materials available. The sites also cover geographical areas to allow research on the specific state, and frequently city, where a person lives. As an example, this reviewer was able to identify a resource in Duluth, Minnesota that offers adaptive training for basketball wheelchairs, ski and archery equipment. …

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