The Evolution of ODL System in Nigeria: The Place of Nigerian Students of Conventional University Age Bracket

By Odeyemi, Janet O. | Distance Learning, January 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Evolution of ODL System in Nigeria: The Place of Nigerian Students of Conventional University Age Bracket


Odeyemi, Janet O., Distance Learning


Introduction

Nigeria's guiding principle on education is the equipping of every citizen with knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values that will enable the individual to derive maximum benefit from being a member of the society and to lead a fulfilling life as well as contribute to both the development and welfare of the society. Educational objectives in Nigeria include the inculcation of national consciousness and national unity, inculcation of true values and attitudes needed for the survival of an individual and the society, and training for understanding the world as a whole. These objectives are viable; however, educational development has faced many constraints. Globally, education is seen as the enabler for all, and the continent of Africa particularly needs education for its continued development-the type that can cushion the effect of war, famine, and other man-madeyriatural catastrophes.

A closer look at the educational scene in Nigeria reveals many disparities, including disparities observed between rural and urban schools and federal-owned and privately owned schools. Gaps are also observed in the enrolment of the genders; admission figures and the available teaching resources.

Figure 1 shows the Nigeria education system and the expected age range toward attaining the educational objectives. It shows the primary school and its expected age bracket, as well as secondary and the tertiary institutions. The higher education is shown as including the colleges of education, polytechnics, colleges of technology and the universities. This paper has as its purview, the Nigerian youths of university age bracket. It will therefore, look into higher education alone.

Overview of Higher Education in Nigeria

Higher education holds a strategic place in national development; it is the platform for the production of quality graduates to drive the various sectors of the economy. Higher education is also seen as the bedrock of the human capital development in economic, agriculture, infrastructure, energy, oil and gas, and other sectors. The importance of higher education in Nigeria and Africa as a whole in catalyzing national development cannot be overemphasized (Adei, 2001).

The polytechnics, colleges of education, and universities are the subsectors that produce higher education in Nigeria. Within its 774 local governments in 6 geopolitical zones there are 104 universities. The breakdown includes 40 federal, 39 state, and 50 private universities ("Nigerian Universities," 2013). All these universities are to produce highly skilled manpower for the nation and as a segment of the public service; their management is being guided by various policies. A survey of higher education faces an increasingly hostile and complex issues pertaining to enrolment in conventional education in Africa. This remains a great challenge all over Africa, including Nigeria where closer survey of university education shows serious constraints in the issues of enrollment. In Africa alone, it is said that 10.1 million people are out of school. In Nigeria, 16% of the population accounts for school children, of which 26% are not able to complete the cycle of education. There are an astounding 40 million illiterates (EFA: Profile, 2007). All these have put a peg in the current efforts of developing the educational sector to meet the goals of both the Millennium Development Goals and the Education for All (EFA) targets by 2015. Dodds (2002) observed that globally, 125 million are out-of-school; Africa has more than 50 million out of this total. What, then, are the challenges inhibiting the educational development in Africa, especially in Nigeria?

Challenges of Higher Education

The demand for university education is growing in leaps and bounds. This is as a result of high birthrate in some parts of Africa. Nigeria alone is witnessing exponential population growth. According to the EFA profile on Nigeria on Global status (2007), the high rate of population growth has put immense pressure on the country's resources and overstretched public services and the available infrastructure. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Evolution of ODL System in Nigeria: The Place of Nigerian Students of Conventional University Age Bracket
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.