Consumer Switching Behavior from Online Banking to Mobile Banking

By Yu, Chian-Son | International Journal of Cyber Society and Education, June 2014 | Go to article overview

Consumer Switching Behavior from Online Banking to Mobile Banking


Yu, Chian-Son, International Journal of Cyber Society and Education


INTRODUCTION

Internet banking and mobile banking are generally perceived as forms of electronic banking that achieves similar purposes (Laforet & Li, 2005; Laukkanen, 2007; Mintel Market Research Report, 2010; Mobile Banking Association, 2009 & 2011; Sripalawat et al., 2011; Suoranta & Mattila, 2004). However, people access Internet banking via computers connected to the Internet, whereas people access mobile banking via wireless devices (Riquelme & Rios, 2010). Suoranta and Mattila (2004) observed that people frequently choose mobile banking because they favor mobility. Singh et al. (2010) discovered that time-critical customers consider the always-on functionality the most essential feature that attracts them to use mobile banking. By contrast, Koenig-Lewis et al. (2010) noticed that people consider Internet banking the cheaper channel for using banking services. Natarajan et al. (2010) found that Internet banking has substantial advantages in terms of usefulness and purpose and as such, it attracts customers to use online banking services.

As Scornavacca and Hoehle (2007) argued, Internet banking and mobile banking are two alternative channels for banks to deliver services and for customers to acquire services. Several studies (Dasgupta et al., 2011; Koenig-Lewis et al., 2010; Natarajan et al., 2010; Riquelme & Rios, 2010; Scornavacca & Hoehle, 2007;; Singh et al., 2010) reported that Internet banking and mobile banking may differ in channel characteristics and customer preferences. This provides the motivation for this study, which investigates consumers' switching behavior from online to mobile banking. That is, this study aims to understand why certain customers switch from online to mobile banking while others do not (these customers prefer online banking to mobile banking).

The literature review indicated that numerous studies have comprehensively investigated the adoption of a single online or mobile banking, but studies on consumers' switching from online to mobile banking are scant. Similarly, the literature revealed that the adoption of a single technology-enabled service or product has been widely investigated over the past three decades. Conversely, research on consumers' switching behavior from one technology-enabled service or product to another is rare. Therefore, research on consumers' switching behavior between technology-enabled products (i.e., Kindle Fire versus Nook Simple Touch) or services (i.e., online banking versus mobile banking) is critical and deserves more attention. The extensive literature review on consumers' switching behavior also indicated that the earliest research on consumer switching behavior was conducted by Keaveney (1995). Since then, studies investigated consumers' switching behavior (Bansal & Taylor, 1999; Clemes et al., 2010; Ganesh et al., 2000; Keaveney & Parthasarathy, 2001; Lopez et al., 2006; Mavri & Ioannou, 2008; Roos, 1999; Roos & Gustafsson, 2011; Shin & Kim, 2007; Wieringa & Verhoef, 2007) to help managers and researchers understand this behavior in service industries; however, these studies focused on switching from one provider to another rather on switching between competing services that achieve similar purposes.

In addition, the third impetus for this study was that major social psychology theory-based studies focused almost entirely on the adoption of a single service or product. By adopting a comparative concept with an attempt to build on current social psychological theories, this study may expand the applicable domain of these theories from the adoption of single products or services to the choice between competing products or services that achieve similar purposes and functions. Accordingly, the rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 reviews the related literature, Section 3 paves a theoretical basis and presents the research structure, and Section 4 addresses how to measure constructs and develop a valid questionnaire. …

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