How Doctors Botch Their Employment Interviews

By Cejka, Sue | Medical Economics, September 7, 1998 | Go to article overview

How Doctors Botch Their Employment Interviews


Cejka, Sue, Medical Economics


Even the most sterling of credentials can't make up for these mistakes.

Many doctors seem to think that just showing up for an interview is enough to land them a job. They couldn't be more wrong.

Making a winning impression face to face is a lot like playing chess. Each move you make must be part of a logical sequence in a fluid situation. Think in advance about what you'll say, or won't say, and re-evaluate it as the interview progresses.

Actually, doctors think this way all the time-as clinicians diagnosing and treating patients. The same analytical skills can help them devise a successful strategy for job interviews. Yet many fine physicians fail to draw on those skills and, instead, blow interviews with senseless blunders like these:

They show up looking unprofessional. It happens more often than you'd suspect. The CV is impressive, the experience strong, the references glowing. But the candidate arrives for the interview dressed for failure. True, clothes don't make the doctor-but they sure can help get him the job he wants. A shirt with a yellowed or frayed collar, a sport jacket that resembles something off the rack at Kmart, or a tie with penicillin stains does nothing to impress an interviewer.

Here are the keys to make attire work in your favor: A man should wear a conservative dark suit, white shirt, shined dress shoes, and a sedate tie made of silk-the only material endorsed by fashion experts. A woman should wear a dress or suit in a dark or neutral shade, and low to medium heels. Never wear pants or clunky jewelry, and never go without spare stockings in your bag in case there's a run.

They don't bring a list of key questions. We sent a candidate to interview with an FP group in Colorado. "Do you remember all the points you need to cover?" we asked him before he left. He smiled smugly and tapped his head, as if to say, "It's all in here."

After hours of stressful interviewing and socializing, however, he realized that he hadn't asked about the job's on-call schedule or the cost of the practice buy-in. He'd even forgotten to ask about the group's vacation policy.

You're likely to have dozens of questions about any job. During the interview, it's easy to overlook some important ones, so jot them down beforehand. You needn't worry about creating an unfavorable impression by bringing a list of questions with you. Actually, it shows sincerity and attention to detail.

Don't count on the interviewer to share vital information without being asked. You may well be dealing with another doctor, one who's inexperienced at conducting interviews. That means you'll have to take the initiative.

You might, for example, present several diagnoses and ask how such cases are handled at the group or clinic. What are the doctors' treatment patterns? Their philosophy on testing? Their attitudes about managed care? How big would your patient load be? Only when you have those answers will you know whether you and the job are a good fit.

Another concern: The interviewer may take your failure to ask key questions as a sign of indifference, failure to prepare, or even lack of basic common sense. That, of course, can knock you out of the running.

They ask the right questions-at the wrong time. Asking right off the bat about salary or an employer's vacation policy may suggest that you lack a strong work ethic. That first impression can be tough to dislodge. Initially, your goal should be to learn as much as you can about the practice and its patients. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Doctors Botch Their Employment Interviews
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.