Monkey Me and the Golden Monkey

By Möller, Karla J. | Language Arts, September 2014 | Go to article overview

Monkey Me and the Golden Monkey


Möller, Karla J., Language Arts


Monkey Me and the Golden Monkey Written and illustrated by Timothy Roland Scholastic, 2014, 90 pp., ISBN 978-0- 545- 55977- 5

A combined narrative chapter book and graphic novel, Monkey Me and the Golden Monkey offers primary grade readers a likeable sibling pair-Clyde, a young boy with hyperkinetic tendencies, and his twin sister Claudia, who tries to keep him out of trouble. When Clyde's head starts to spin, Claudia knows his excitement has reached its peak, so she sticks close by his side. She cannot save him from himself, however, when on a school field trip to the local science museum, Clyde quickly eats an irradiated banana. This impulsive act is a good thing for readers, however, as that banana brings out the monkey in Clyde and turns him into the series' title character.

Part sibling adventure, part mystery, part comedic mix-up, the plot of the initial volume revolves around a run-in between Clyde and a supposed museum security guard during a class field trip that involves a set of Golden Monkey figures-one a solid gold sculpted ornament displayed as an objet d'art and the other Clyde's plastic replica from the giftshop. The book offers a quick-moving plot and simple but expressive black ink illustrations. Clyde's monkey phases are told in full graphic-panel format, enhancing the excitement of the madcap, super-power- enhanced escapades.

The siblings clearly have a close relationship. …

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