Ability to Deal with Failure Determines Your Success

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), August 28, 2014 | Go to article overview

Ability to Deal with Failure Determines Your Success


New Delhi, Aug. 27 -- It is unfortunate that today's world is so competitive in nature that we are almost obsessed with success and achievement. Because of this pressure, experiencing a failure or a setback is often made out to be the worst possible thing that could have happened to a person. But the reality is that failure is an inevitable and inescapable part of life, both educational as well as personal. Expecting to sail through without a hiccup is unrealistic and sets you up to fall harder in case you are unsuccessful in a venture. Rejection is always rough, but our ability to deal with failure and rejection would determine how successful and happy we are. We need to stop avoiding failure, and instead focus on bouncing back by gaining the resiliency needed to cope with it.

Refocus on strengths: We should evaluate our performance, and try to improve upon our strengths. Identifying the positives would help us be more optimistic about the future. Most importantly, we should pay attention to, notice and appreciate our strengths. This helps us remind ourselves what we are good at.

Seek feedback, and acknowledge your mistakes: Instead of sitting and crying over spilt milk, we need to seek feedback to re-evaluate ourselves, and identify our weaknesses. It is necessary to find out where exactly we might have gone wrong, and also discover ways of improving upon these weaknesses, so we can learn from our mistakes.

Re-plan: Based on the feedback, we should review what failure has taught us, and restructure our plan for the future, incorporating better methods and trying not to repeat the mistakes of our past.

Expectations: While -planning our goals, we must always keep in mind the possible factors that can influence the outcome. …

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