Dirt: Faye Resnick Sells to Jack Huston in Hollywood Hills

By David, Mark | Variety, August 12, 2014 | Go to article overview

Dirt: Faye Resnick Sells to Jack Huston in Hollywood Hills


David, Mark, Variety


Decorator and "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" regular Faye Resnick sold a newly refurbished residence in a famously celebritypacked nook of the Hollywood Hills for $2.29 million. Resnick, who penned a pair of scandalous books on the O.J. Simpson murder trial and posed for Playboy before she did up homes for Paris Hilton, Kyle Richards, Nick Lachey and Kevin Connolly, purchased the property with her then-fiancee, Everett Jack Jr. in December 2012, for $1,605 million. Some of the more notable folk who live close enough to borrow sugar are Quentin Tarantino, Jake Gyllenhaal and David Hockney.

The buyer's identity is shielded behind a trust, but real estate yenta Yolanda Yakketyyak swears on her fastidiously preserved 1985 Cadillac Seville that the buyer of the double-lot spread is oft-mustachioed actor Jack Huston - Angelica Huston's nephew - and his model girlfriend/baby momma Shannan Click.

The black-shuttered, two-story residence, hidden from the street by a tall wall of shrubbery, sits at the tail end of a long, rising-sloped and gated driveway, and has three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms in 2,567 square feet. Dark brown wood floors flow throughout the interconnected and exuberantly decorated open-plan living spaces on the upper floor, which include a living room with library nook, dining area, family room with built-in entertainment unit, and center island eat-in kitchen with marble countertops and top-grade appliances. Four sets of French doors open the upper floor to a slender, Saltillo-tiled north-facing veranda with an over-thetreetops sky and mountain view.

The upper-level master suite has two fitted walk-in closets, a private balcony and a liberally mirrored and marbled bathroom, while two en-suite bedrooms and a second family room on the lower level open through more French doors to another Saltillotiled veranda that steps down to a glammy, oval-shaped swimming pool ringed by a thin strip of grass and a thick wall of foliage.

TINA BROWN LISTS MANSE IN HAMPTONS

Last fall Tina Brown resigned her stormy post as editor-in-chief at still-not-profitable the Daily Beast, which she co-founded in 2008 with Barry Diller, in order to launch an eponymous media company, write a memoir and - as it turns out - shake up her property portfolio. A kind snitch in the Hamptons sent word by digital carrier pigeon that the vaunted if occasionally controversial media maven, who previously topped the editorial mastheads at Vanity Fair and the New Yorker, has hoisted her oceanfront hideaway in the sleepy and staid community of Quogue on the open market for $11.85 million.

Property records show the New York City-based Miz Brown and her husband, veteran journalist and Conde Nast Traveler founder Sir Harold Evans, acquired the property in the fall of 1995 for $920,000, and marketing materials reveal the 2.9-acre spread lays claim to 206 feet of ocean frontage, and has a swimming pool tucked into a scrubby sylvan setting on the front side of the house. The recently rebuilt shingle-sided dune-topper spans about 5,900 square feet, with five en suite guest bedrooms plus a self-contained one-bed and one-bath guest unit. In addition to dual closets, a coffee bar, private Oceanside terraces and a tiled bathroom with a power shower - whatever that is - the main floor master suite encompasses a pair of adjoining offices that flank a double-height library. …

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