International Migration: An Obstacle to Achieving World Stability

By Lamb, Kevin | The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies, Fall 2014 | Go to article overview

International Migration: An Obstacle to Achieving World Stability


Lamb, Kevin, The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies


International Migration: An Obstacle to Achieving World Stability

Dr. John H. Tanton

Social Contract Press, 2014

Author John H. Tanton has written widely on population and the pressure of population on environment, columnist Linda Chavez once described him as "the most influential unknown man in America" in part due to his work on population and resources. Along with Garrett Hardin, Leon Bouvier, and Albert Bartlett, he has specifically highlighted a little discussed problem - the pressure being put on the US environment by massive immigration and resultant population growth.

A major contribution by Tanton to our understanding of the impact of excess human population was the original publication of this study by The Ecologist. In this he outlined the extent of the problems stemming from the rising tide of international migration, identifying it as a destabilizing force in developing as well as developed nations. Placed third in the 1975 Mitchell Prize competition, this study has now been republished in slightly abbreviated form; its thesis is just as timely as it was some 40 years ago, possibly more so.

One central objective for developed nations is to achieve economic and social stability. In other words, a steady, sustainable state whereby productivity and consumption levels reflect a stable or only moderately growing population with a balanced use of natural resources. International migration patterns in which emigrants leave underdeveloped nations and settle in developed nations foster an imbalance of both skilled and unskilled workers for developed and underdeveloped nations alike. Any rise in living standards in underdeveloped nations tends to be held back by the "brain drain" of higher-skilled workers moving into developed nations with more robust economies, and this in turn usually spawns an influx of, often illegal, lesser-skilled migrants into the magnet countries. …

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