Speaking Up: A History of Language and Politics in Canada and Quebec

By Mann, Jatinder | British Journal of Canadian Studies, July 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Speaking Up: A History of Language and Politics in Canada and Quebec


Mann, Jatinder, British Journal of Canadian Studies


Marcel Martel and Martin Pâquet, Speaking Up: A History of Language and Politics in Canada and Quebec (Toronto: Between the Lines Press, 2012), 312 pp. Paper. $29.95. ISBN 978-1-926662-93-0.

This book (which is an English translation of a multi-award winning book published in French by the authors in 2010) explores the history of language and politics in Canada and Quebec from the sixteenth century to the present. Through this broad historical narrative it focuses on particular highpoints, including, 'From religion to language: 1539-1848'; 'The school crises in Canada, 1848-1927'; 'From the repeal of Regulation 17 to the Laurendeau-Dunton Commission, 1927-63'; 'Action-reaction: Commissions of inquiry and agitation, 1963-69'; 'Language laws, 1969-82'; and 'Law and language since 1982'.

One of the strengths of the book is the dispassionate way in which the authors deal with a very controversial and politically laden issue in both Canada and Quebec: language and politics. Martel and Pâquet make the point that language and politics as an issue has evolved over a long period and was very much influenced by the historical context at the time. So, for example, in the aftermath of the rebellions in the Canadas in the 1840s there was a rise of French linguistic nationalism which gathered strength in light of the Durham Report and the unification of the Canadas and Durham's openly declared goal of assimilating French-Canadians into an 'English' Canada. The school crises in Canada during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, particularly in Ontario and Manitoba, highlighted to French-Canadians that the English-speaking majority of the country did not envisage Canada to be an equal domain for both of the founding European peoples. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Speaking Up: A History of Language and Politics in Canada and Quebec
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.