Organized Crime in Mexico: Assessing the Threat to North American Economies

By Cooper, Mary Ann | The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, September 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Organized Crime in Mexico: Assessing the Threat to North American Economies


Cooper, Mary Ann, The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education


Organized Crime in Mexico: Assessing the Threat to North American Economies by Cameron H. Holmes. 2014. 184 pp. ISBN: 9781612346625. $24.95 Potomac Books Inc., Dulles, Va., (703) 661-1548. https://potomac.presswarehouse.com

Americans have received increasingly dire warnings about traveling in Mexico. Reports of rising street crime and kidnappings have had a chilling effect on the travel industry there and fueled fear about the security of our southern border - fears that have turned a humanitarian crisis prompted by children fleeing gang warfare and human trafficking in some Latin American nations into an ugly and polarizing political issue. While this book only addresses organized crime in Mexico, it does give insight into how some countries devolve into debilitating lawlessness that not only threatens the safety and security of its citizens, but also damages its economy and threatens the financial stability of its neighboring countries.

Organized Crime in Mexico examines the grim implications of the persistent and controlling criminal enterprises in northern Mexico. Putting these activities in context, it compares and contrasts the current threat that exists to prior threats that have made headlines over the years, including drug and human smuggling during the latter half of the 20th century. The author, Cameron H. Holmes, begins with the proposition, "Criminal organizations operating in Mexico and the United States threaten the economic wellbeing of North America as well as the democratic freedoms of our neighbor to the south. …

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