Disney Animator Glen Keane Gives NFTS Masterclass

Screen International, October 7, 2014 | Go to article overview

Disney Animator Glen Keane Gives NFTS Masterclass


Animation supervisor on The Little Mermaid, Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast shares experiences.

Disney character designer and animation supervisor Glen Keane gave a Screen Arts lecture to a packed audience of NFTS students.

After screening his new animation Duet, Glen sketched one of his most iconic creations, Beast from Disney's Beauty and the Beast under a camera projected live onto the School's cinema screen.

Speaking in conversation with the school's head of directing animation, Helen Nabarro, Keane talked about his career and answered questions from the students.

Keane said his career began when his portfolio was sent to the wrong department at CalArts; he was applying for a painting course and was instead accepted to the animation course.

Despite enjoying a career stretching back 40 years, he said he still often feels like a beginner: "I'm constantly learning my craft and trying to grow as an artist."

Known for his work as character designer and animation supervisor for Aladdin, Pocahontas, The Little Mermaid, Tarzan, Tangled and Beauty and the Beast, amongst many others, Keane also designed the characters for Paperman, winner of the 2013 Oscar for Best Short Animation.

In 2013. he was named a 'Disney Legend'.

After 38 years with Disney, Keane said he felt the time had come to step out on his own and he left in 2012 to work on Duet with his son Max.

The film was designed to explore spatial awareness and the sensory inputs of a mobile device to create a distinctive storytelling experience, and was consequently shot in 60 frames per second which is practically unheard of in animation (typically 24 frames per second). …

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