Today in History - Oct. 23

The Canadian Press, October 10, 2014 | Go to article overview

Today in History - Oct. 23


Today in History - Oct. 23

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Today in History for Oct. 23:

On this date:

In 4004 BC, according to the sacred timeline worked out by Archbishop James Ussher, "the heavens and the earth" were created on this date at 9 a.m. (GMT). Ussher's Chronologies of the Old and New Testaments were first published 1650-54.

In 1239, in England, the main cathedral at Wells, begun in 1186, was consecrated. The most striking interior feature of the cathedral are the inverted arches (14th century) by which the piers of the tower are strengthened.

In 1385, in Germany, the University of Heidelberg was founded under Pope Urban VI as a college of the Cistercian order. Among its faculties today are theology, law, medicine and philosophy.

In 1707, the first Parliament of Great Britain, created by the Acts of Union between England and Scotland, held its first meeting.

In 1837, a meeting at St-Charles, Que., marked the beginning of the Rebellion of 1837 in Lower Canada.

In 1847, telegraph service was opened from Montreal to Albany and New York.

In 1864, the Canadian militia arrested 14 U.S. fugitives after the men robbed three banks in Vermont of $200,000 and killed one person before heading north to Canada. The men were escaped prisoners of the Civil War and had been hiding out in Montreal before they went to St. Albans, Vt., to rob the banks. They returned to Canada with some of the loot, but only $19,000 was recovered.

In 1874, Harvard beat McGill in the first inter-collegiate football game in Canada.

In 1885, artist Lawren Stewart Harris, a member of the Group of Seven, was born in Brantford, Ont. An heir to the Massey-Harris fortune, he was the social convener of the group -- he started the Arts and Letters club where many of them met. He formed the idea of the Studio Building, where they could all work, and paid for most of it. He also outfitted a boxcar as a studio on wheels, complete with living and sleeping areas, and took all his artist friends on all-expenses-paid trips to Algoma where they found the landscape that inspired many of their works.

In 1910, Blanche S. Scott became the first woman to make a solo, public airplane flight. She reached an altitude of four metres over a park in Fort Wayne, Ind.

In 1915, 25,000 women marched in New York City demanding the right to vote.

In 1924, Ontarians voted, by a narrow margin, to maintain Prohibition in the province. It lasted from 1916 until 1927.

In 1942, the Second World War Battle of El-Alamein began in North Africa. It ended in an Allied victory on Nov. 4.

In 1942, author Michael Crichton was born in Chicago. He wrote such historic and prehistoric science fantasies as "Jurassic Park," "Timeline" and "The Andromeda Strain." In 1994, he also created the award-winning TV hospital series "ER." He died on Nov. 4, 2008 of cancer at age 66.

In 1946, the United Nations General Assembly met in New York for the first time.

In 1950, University of Toronto researchers announced the development of an electronic heart pacemaker.

In 1952, Canadians fought their heaviest battle of the Korean War on Little Gibraltar Hill.

In 1956, students and workers in Budapest began an unsuccessful revolt against the Soviet Union. The country had been occupied by forces of the Soviet Union since the end of the Second World War. Opposition to the communists started building in 1956 and street demonstrations by students began Oct. 23. The protests spread spontaneously, and became national with insurgents occupying public buildings and production centres. Soviet forces counter-attacked on Nov. 4 and fighting was intense for about a week before the revolution was quelled.

In 1958, Soviet poet-novelist Boris Pasternak, author of "Doctor Zhivago," was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. But Kremlin authorities, unhappy with the novel's indictment of socialism, pressured him into refusing the honour. …

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