Allison Tolman Says It Feels 'Bittersweet' Not to Return for 'Fargo' Season 2

By Kane, Laura | The Canadian Press, October 16, 2014 | Go to article overview

Allison Tolman Says It Feels 'Bittersweet' Not to Return for 'Fargo' Season 2


Kane, Laura, The Canadian Press


Allison Tolman sad not to return to 'Fargo'

--

TORONTO - Allison Tolman says it feels "bittersweet" to not be returning to FX's "Fargo."

Her plucky performance as Det. Molly Solverson won her hordes of fans and an Emmy nomination. But the second season will be set in the past, meaning Tolman and fellow stars including Colin Hanks won't be back.

"I'm so sad to not be going back with them because it was such an incredible golden time for me," said Tolman in a telephone interview.

"I'm also so thrilled and so thankful for the opportunity that this has opened up for me. I'm just really excited to see, if it's not 'Fargo,' then what the next thing is. I can't wait to see what the next thing is going to be."

Showrunner Noah Hawley has admitted it's a "crime and a tragedy" to let go of Tolman, a previously unknown actress whose Molly quickly won the hearts of fans and critics. But he said it would be "disingenuous" to give her character another wild, Coen brothers-esque case to solve, so he decided to set season 2 in 1979.

"I got my butt to L.A. pretty fast as soon as I found that out," said Tolman with a laugh. "I certainly didn't want to squander this awesome opportunity that I was afforded by landing this role ... It feels like a lot of responsibility. There's a big potential for a sophomore slump."

Season 1 of "Fargo" is available on DVD and Blu-ray now. The 10-episode story followed Molly and another officer, Gus Grimly (Hanks), as they tried to solve a series of murders linked to hapless insurance salesman Lester Nygaard (Martin Freeman) and violent criminal Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton).

Tolman, 32, had been temping as a receptionist at a consulting firm for $11 an hour when she auditioned for Molly. She had moved to Chicago from Dallas about five years earlier to study at Second City's famed comedy program.

She felt the chances of her landing the "Fargo" role were "far-fetched," but she threw in a tape anyway. Tolman didn't even tell her family and friends that she made it through callbacks. When Hawley finally phoned her to tell her she had won the part, she was "stunned."

"I was very polite and then I told him I had to go back to work," she said, laughing. "I did try to finish out my work day, but I couldn't focus and had to just leave and start calling my family.

"I remember the distinct feeling of waking up the next morning. It was like when you have a really good dream where you bought a car or you won some money, and then you wake up and you're like, 'Oh, man, that was my dream.' I remember distinctly feeling that way the next morning and thinking, 'Oh God, did that really happen?'"

Tolman had been working as an actress for years, whether in theatre or commercials or improv and sketch comedy. But "Fargo" marked her first television series.

"My main concern was that I had never done this before and I wasn't going to know the technical side of it. …

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