Mass Media Social Marketing Campaigns: A Practitioners Perspective

By van Esch, Patrick; Tsartsidze, Darejan et al. | International Journal of Marketing Studies, October 2014 | Go to article overview

Mass Media Social Marketing Campaigns: A Practitioners Perspective


van Esch, Patrick, Tsartsidze, Darejan, van Esch, Linda Jean, International Journal of Marketing Studies


Abstract

This paper explores mass media social marketing practitioner perspectives of the intersect where the dimensions of religion taxonomy and mass media social marketing campaigns meet. Under an interpretive paradigm (Crotty, 1998), in-depth interviews were conducted with five expert mass media social marketing practitioners in Australia. The data was analysed qualitatively with the data analysis software package NVivo. Five themes emerged from the results: (1) The dimension of religion taxonomy does have application in mass media social marketing campaigns; (2) The use of a 'patriarch' in mass media social marketing campaigns and the possible implications; (3) The use of fantasy as a driver for voluntary behaviour change; (4) The assurance of salvation as a driver for voluntary behaviour change and (5) The consideration to use Jung Theory in mass media social marketing campaigns and the possible implications.

Keywords: dimensions of religion, in-depth interviews, mass media social marketing campaigns, Nvivo software, tree map analysis, qualitative research

1. Introduction

Founded in an earlier paper (Van Esch & Van Esch, 2013); both the dimensions of religion and mass media social marketing campaigns continue to receive growing attention in the literature. The analysis and review of mass media social marketing campaigns is a continuation of the body of work founded in Van Esch et al. (2013) and the analysis of social marketing campaign texts has recently been reported and founded in Van Esch et al. (2014). The data was collected from five expert mass media social marketing practitioners who were identified from government and/or private agencies that specialise in the design, creation and evaluation of mass media social marketing campaigns and who have been directly related to or have experienced the topic under investigation. Due to the fact that only a small sample size has had interaction with the emerging topic, demographic data has been deliberately omitted to protect the anonymity of the research participants.

2. Theoretical Foundations

The intent of this study was to explore the relationship between the dimensions of religion and mass media social marketing and particularly, how to draw on and incorporate aspects of the dimensions of religion (i.e. a classification system in the field of religious studies) and how it may fit the social marketing framework as a means of influencing decision making processes in an attempt to drive mass voluntary behaviour change. Furthermore, it could be argued that the relationship under investigation may impact an element of culture that pervades every aspect of a society. Therefore, its effect on behaviour cannot be underestimated by marketers (Fam, Waller, & Erdogan, 2002).

2.1 Religion and Its Dimensions

Fam, Waller and Erdogan (2002) continue to argue that "in a constantly changing and increasingly globalized world, religion still plays a significant role in influencing consumer behaviour". Religious beliefs play a significant part in sculpting social behaviour. Differences in religious affiliations, 74% of Australia's population reported having a religious affiliation (ABS, 2004; 2006), 77% of Britain's population reported belonging to a religion (ONS, 2001) whilst 79.9% of America's population indicated they had a religious identification (Kosmin and Keysar, 2008), tend to influence the way people live, the choices they make, what they eat and whom they associate with. According to Hirschman (1983), religious affiliations help shape attitudes towards dancing, magazines, restaurants and political ideas. According to Fam, Waller and Erdogan (2002), the influence of i~ligious beliefs on individual and social behaviour is well documented (Anand and Kumar, 1982; Birch et al., 2001; Greeley, 1977; Hirschman, 1983; LaBarbera, 1987; Luqmani et al., 1987; McDaniel and Burnett, 1990; Michell and Al-Mossawi, 1999; Uppal, 1986; Waller and Fam, 2000;). …

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