Mideast's Media Portrayals of Isis Are No Joke

By Kamin, Debra | Variety, October 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Mideast's Media Portrayals of Isis Are No Joke


Kamin, Debra, Variety


As Isis, the fundamentalist Islamic group that has claimed swaths of Syria and Iraq as an independent state, continues its advance in the face of U.S. bombing, televised satire, with regional prejudices at its center, is being used in the Arab world to counter the group's messages.

In Iraq, Al-Iraqiyya TV on Sept. 9 aired "The Superstitious State," a ragtag musical comedy in which a character in a devil suit weds a Jewish princess (complete with a Star of David necklace and cheap drugstore tiara). The pair discover that their spawn - hatched from a giant egg - is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the selfproclaimed leader of Isis. Supporting characters in the cast include a whiskey-swigging American cowboy who serves as matchmaker.

The program has aired several times a day since its debut. It's being squeezed onto crowded Iraqi airwaves that now feature a slew of anti-Isis satirical cartoons, in which bumbling animated terrorists misfire their weapons or run scared through the desert with Iraqi security officials at their heels. Think the antics of Wile E. Coyote, but with more sand, much higher stakes, and not a roadrunner in sight.

It's not just Iraqi TV that's using satire in an effort to sway its citizens against Isis. Similar tropes have played out on Lebanese TV, where the "Saturday Night Live"-style Ktir Salbe troupe has mocked the group, and on programs across the Palestinian territory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mideast's Media Portrayals of Isis Are No Joke
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.