Multiculturalism and the Therapeutic Process

By Kinzie, J. David | American Journal of Psychotherapy, January 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

Multiculturalism and the Therapeutic Process


Kinzie, J. David, American Journal of Psychotherapy


JUDITH MISHNE: Multiculturalism and the Therapeutic Process, Guilford Press, New York, 2002, $35.00, 268 pp., ISBN 1-5723-0775-7.

As our society grows increasingly culturally diverse, we must adjust our treatments to be sensitive and appropriate to diverse populations. Several excellent books have recently detailed the challenges of providing psychiatric services to patients from different cultures (Tseng, W.S., Handbook of Cultural Psychiatry; Okpaku, S.O., Clinical Methods in Transcultural Psychiatry; Gaw, A.C., Culture, Ethnicity and Mental Illness). Judith Mishne, Ph.D., a professor of social work at New York University, has a more focused approach. Her goal is to describe how psychoanalytically oriented therapy can be used to treat culturally diverse patients. To be sure, the approach is modified, and indeed, the modification results in a sensitivity to patients that is the greatest strength of this book.

Multiculturalism and the Therapeutic Process begins with an introduction on the development and need for cross-cultural therapy, and then follows the analytic model with sections on the beginning, middle, and end phases of the treatment process. Each section usually provides a definition or literature review of the topics covered, such as transference, countertransference, and resistance, with a discussion of the ethnic and cultural factors that influence each of these phases, followed by a detailed case history, illustrating the major points. The author's position, stated throughout the book, is that recent theories of self psychology and intersubjectivity are most relevant to cross-cultural psychotherapy. The latter involves the empathy and awareness of the reciprocal interplay between two or more subjective worlds. This certainly rings true experientially without the need for an abstract theory. The case examples indicate flexibility and honesty that seem unusual in case reports. For example, the first case describes a negative outcome, despite prolonged assessment and competent cultural understanding. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Multiculturalism and the Therapeutic Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.