The Rise of the Healthy Individual

By Friedman, Jerry; St Jean, Emmanuelle | Policy & Practice, October 2014 | Go to article overview

The Rise of the Healthy Individual


Friedman, Jerry, St Jean, Emmanuelle, Policy & Practice


Tracking Grassroots Commitment to Health and Human Service Convergence

LEADING A GROUNDSWELL OF CHANGE

Local jurisdictions such as counties and cities are in an excellent position to drive health and human service convergence. For example, consider counties' unique ability as policymakers to incorporate social determinants of health into their approaches to achieve better health outcomes:

* Local safety nets. Counties deliver individual and populationbased services such as indigent care; behavioral health; nutrition counseling; disease surveillance, screening and treatment; violence prevention; employment services and residential services.

I Significant investment. Counties invest $69.7 billion in health2 and $53.8 billion in public welfare3 (e.g., housing, public assistance, nutrition assistance, etc.) to provide these services via health and human service departments and health care facilities.

I Multiple touchpoints. Counties often serve the same individuals and families through various agencies.

I Services coordination. Coordinating comprehensive services delivery in a data-driven manner is critical to counties, as it allows them to address multiple needs in a more efficient, effective, and holistic manner to better serve people.

MAKING A REAL IMPACT ON HEALTH OUTCOMES

Data indicate that social determinants of health account for as much as 40 percent of poor health outcomes.4 These determinants also influence health behaviors (e.g., tobacco use, substance use, physical activity), which also affect health outcomes.5

By addressing the socioeconomic factors and the context in which individuals make default decisions, interventions are likely to have the greatest impact on a population.6 For example, Plumas County, CA, a rural county with a population of approximately 20,000, has engaged the community at all levels with its 20,000 Lives Initiative across its mountainous terrain.

For the past several years, Plumas County has partnered with tribal organizations, the health care system, community organizations, and local businesses to obtain data to better address the community's needs. The Plumas County Public Health Agency also collaborated with the school district to ensure that families of children receiving free school lunches are enrolled in Medicaid and social service programs, if they are eligible. By using socioeconomic data and coordinating efforts with the education system, the county has been able to address access to care for both children and adults.

AN EXPLORATION OF EMERGINGTRENDS

Health and human service convergence is a complex undertaking fueled by the need for coordination, innovation, leadership, and inspiration. Add a healthy dose of strong governance, and counties can drive progress through incremental success.

The National Association of Counties' (NACo) Healthy Counties Initiative helps counties share best practices, whether they are urban or rural, regardless of their available capital and human resources. Counties are linked by their growing understanding that the data reveal a compelling story about the need to break through traditional silos that commonly isolate health and human service delivery from one another. The Healthy Counties Initiative was launched in 2011 to enhance publicprivate partnerships in local health delivery, improve individual and community health, and assist counties to implement federal health reform.

As counties independently demonstrate the benefits of addressing the social determinants of health while coordinating services, broad trends have emerged that characterize the dynamics of health and human services convergence today:

1. Addressing the social determinants of health at the local level is a movement spreading across the nation.

As noted earlier, convergence is taking root locally in diverse areas, driven by cost pressures and the hyper-transformation triggered by the Affordable Care Act. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Rise of the Healthy Individual
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.