Ventana Sur: Limelight for LatAm

By Kay, Jeremy | Screen International, November 21, 2014 | Go to article overview

Ventana Sur: Limelight for LatAm


Kay, Jeremy, Screen International


Jérome Paillard tells Jeremy Kay about how Ventana Sur is expanding its scope.

Now in its sixth year, the Ventana Sur market in Buenos Aires is beginning to flex its muscles beyond merely a trading post for Latin American cinema.

Backed by INCAA (Argentinean support body the National Institute Of Cinema and Audiovisual Arts) and the EU's MEDIA programme and scheduled to run from December 1-5, the Argentinean event is consolidating its outreach into genre film and a more outward-looking sensibility that this year will involve European cinema in a big way.

With around 2,000 attendees projected to descend on the event, roughly 120 screenings and an extensive library of more than 300 titles, expectations of a productive market are high.

"We don't have a beach, so there's no temptation to sit in the sun," says Jérome Paillard, who serves as Ventana Sur co-executive director alongside Bernardo Bergeret. "In Buenos Aires people are very, very involved, which is a key to its success," says Paillard, who also runs the Cannes Marché.

"It's the sixth year of Ventana Sur. The main goal has always been to create a market for Latin American films: completed films where it could be producers looking for sales agents, or sales agents looking for distributors. Maybe half of the films there will already have sales representation or distribution."

There are many ways content partners can engage with each other at Ventana Sur, including a growing emphasis on works-in-progress.

"We have the works in progress: Primer Corte, which are features; and Blood Window, for six works in progress of genre films.

Genre focus

It's the second year of Blood Window. "There's a real industry for this kind of film. It's interesting to see that traditional distributors are looking at this kind of film," says Paillard.

The six Blood Window selections comprise Joe Houlberg's Ecuadorian ghost story, Thirst (Sed); Argentina's thriller, Intimate Witness (Testigo Intimo) from Santiago Fernandez; and Petter Belestorf and Joel Caetano's Brazilian vignettes, The Black Fables (As Fabulas Negras).

A trio of Mexican titles includes Adrian Garcia Bogliano's eagerly anticipated Here Comes The Devil follow-up and kidnap story, Scherzo Diabolico; Diego Cohen's tale of romantic obsession, Honeymoon (Luna De Miel); and Isaac Ezban's profile of an apocalyptic Mexico in The Similars (Los Parecidos). …

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